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  • Abruzzi Italy Region

    Abruzzi wine region

    The region of Abruzzi (Abruzzi is the plural of Abruzzo) is bounded in the north by The Marche, to the west by Lazio, and to the south by Molise. The eastern boundary is formed by the Adriatic. Except for a small strip of land along the coast, the rest of Abruzzi consists of hills, mountains, and valleys. The climate varies from Mediterranean on the coast to continental in the mountains. The best place for cultivating vines has to be chosen with the utmost care. These lie to the north and south of the only true town of Abruzzi, which is Pescara, situated in the valley of the river Pescara. The vineyards sit at the foot of the imposing mountains known as Gran Sasso and Montagna della Maiella. Only two DOC wines originate from this region.

    Abruzzo Italy map{jcomments on}

  • Austrian wines and regions

    Wachau Austrian Wine

    Austrian WineThis Austrian wine region in the picturesque valley of the Danube makes quality wines, including excellent Grüner Veltliner, Neuburger, Chardonnay, and Weiss Burgunder.

    The vineyards are arranged in terraces on steep slopes above the Danube. The underlying geology is mainly of basalt and other igneous rock. This region produces the finest wines of Austria although the competition with Styria is becoming more intense.

  • Baden Wine

      The wine region of Baden is in the south-east of Germany, forming a fairly long strip from the northern shore of the Bodensee by way of the famous Black Forest (Schwarzwald), Freiburg,

     and BadenBaden, to Karlsruhe and Heidelberg, slightly south of the point where the Neckar and Rhine meet. Baden is the second largest wine region of Germany and it has a great diversity of wines to offer. Baden's soil chiefly consists of loess, loam, gravel, some chalk, and volcanic rocks.

    The full-bodied and rounded white wines are made from Miiller-Thurgau, Rulander, Gutedel, Gewürztraminer, and Riesling grapes. These wines often possess spicy and powerful bouquets.

     

    German Württemberg Wine

    German Wine GrapesThe vineyards of Württemberg are situated on hills above the Neckar and its tributaries. 

    Read more about German Württemberg Wine  

    German Rheingau Wine

    German Wine GrapesThe Rheingau is not only the geographical centre of the German wine industry, but also its historic centre.

    Read more about German Rheingau Wine 

    German Rheinpfalz Wine

    German Wine GrapesRheinpfalz is the most French of all the German wine regions.

    Read more about German Rheinpfalz Wine 

    German Mosel-Saar-Ruwer

    German Wine GrapesThis widely known wine region stretches itself out along the Saar, Ruwer, and the Mosel rivers, from Saarburg by way of Trier to Koblenz.. 

    Read more about German Mosel-Saar-Ruwer

    German Saxony Wine

    German Wine GrapesThis is one of the 'new' wine regions of Germany in the former East Germany. Together with the other 'new' region of Saale/ Unstruut they form the most northerly of the German wine areas.

    Read more about  German Saxony Wine 

     

     Spatburgunder is used to make velvet smooth red wines that are lively and rounded, and also the gloriously refreshing Weissherbst. {jcomments on}

  • Bordeaux Cotes de Francs

    Bordeaux Cotes de Francs (A.O.C.)

    Bordeaux Cotes FrancsThe village of Francs, for which this Bordeaux AOC is named, is located near the border of the Dordogne region. Its origins go back to the sixth century. In 507, after the Battle of Vouillé, Clovis I, King of the Francs, fought Alaric II, King of the Visigoths, and conquered the region of Aquitaine. A detachment of the Frankish army set up camp on the site of the village, which was named "Ad Francos" and later Francs.

    As in neighboring regions from Bordeaux, vines have been planted here since ancient times. Far from major highways, the region is calm and pleasant. Its hills, often capped with ruins of windmills and dovecots, are covered in vines; in the lower part of the valley are meadows and farmland.

  • Bordeaux Supérieur and Bordeaux Rosé

    BORDEAUX & BORDEAUX SUPÉRIEUR, BORDEAUX ROSÉ & BORDEAUX CLAIRET (A.O.C.)

    Bordeaux Superieur WineThe Bordeaux and Bordeaux Supérieur AOCs are the largest of the French AOCs in terms of both surface area and volume: more than 50,000 hectares (44 percent of the region’s vineyards) produce more than three million hectoliters annually. Their surface area is equal to the total surface area of all the other appellations in the region.

    The only way to describe these wines is to speak of the diversity of the terroirs (soil and conditions) cov-ered by the title. The vast range of terroirs is united by the vision and passion of the men who grow the grapes and make the wine.

    To describe a Bordeaux AOC wine fully, you would need to speak of each of the two thousand vineyards covered by the label. Red Bordeaux wines are easy to drink: they can be supple, fruity, or rich, depending on the vintage. 

  • Bordeaux Wines

    Bordeaux Wines

    Bordeaux wineBordeaux is the region in perfect viticultural situation almost and is located in France’s west coast. This wine region benefits from ultimate marketing tool that is achateau-dependent classification system, established nearly 150 years back.

    This new era seems to be simply taxing for reputation of Bordeaux as the last 20th century decade was. Rain drenched harvesting towards the ending of 1990s challenged claim of Bordeaux to be an ultimate viticultural paradise but its depressingly poor quality generic wines brought in almost much bad publicity just like grossly inflated rates of modest vintages from top chateaux. In few initial years of 21st century, weather may have improved but the generic Bordeaux quality remained abysmal, rates continued rising that too in direct relation to sales drop and finally something unimaginable took place: Robert Parker, the renowned United States wine critic failed to come for primer tastings in 2003 March.

  • Bulgarian Wine and Region

    Wine BulagariaN areas

    Bulgarian Wine BottlesStatistics show that Bulgaria has achieved great success through the modernisation and adaptation of its wine industry. New grape varieties that are successful have been planted with great haste, such as Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, Sauvignon Blanc, and Chardonnay and inexpensive wines that are easily drunk when young are made in great volume which have conquered the European market through intelligent marketing. Yet Bulgaria has had a rich history of wine-making, producing good wines from native grapes such as the red wine varieties Pamid, Mavrud, Melnik, Gamza, and Rkatziteli, Misket, and Dimiat for white wines.

  • Californian Wine

      California is the best-known wine region of America. The region is subdivided into six main areas. From north to south these are the North Coast (north of San Francisco, home of Napa Valley, Sonama, Carneros wines), Humboldt (on the banks of the Sacrmamento River), Sierra Foothills (at the foot of the Sierra Mountains east of Sacramento), Central Coast (south of San Francisco to slighty north of Los Angeles), Central Valley (a huge area on the banks of the San Joaquin River), and South Coast (between Los Angeles and San Diego).

    AMERICAN WINE *** WINE REVIEWS

    Franciscan monks from Bordeaux with the rather appropriate name of Jean Louis saw th possibilities here in 1830 and he improted countless European varieties of grapes.

    READ MORE...

  • Canon-Fronsac and Grand Mouëys Bordeaux Wines

    Fronsac & Canon-Fronsac Bordeaux Wines

    Chateau Candelaire Canon FronsacThe Term de Fronsac, at the highest point of this area, has been inhabited for many centuries. Under Charlemagne, an impressive fortress was built, which long protected the locals from barbarian invasions.

    Henry IV made Fronsac the centre of his dukedom. On the ruins of the fortress, which was destroyed in 1623, the Duke of Richelieu-who was also Duke of Fronsac-built a charming Italian folly, where elegant, witty parties were held. As a result of these, many of the country's most important figures came to think highly of Fronsac's wines.

    Because of their particularly favorable locations, their terrou", and a microclimate extremely well suited to wine-growing, six towns (Fronsac, La Riviere, Saint-Cermain-la-Riviere, Saint-Michel-de-Fronsac, Sainr-Aignan, and Saillans) plus some parts of Galgon benefit from the specific Fronsac AOC.

  • Champagne - French Wine

        The Champagne district is the most northerly wine region of France, located some ninety miles northeast of Paris. The method of production for champagne is explainde here.

     Originally, the wines of Champagne were still. The cellar master at the Abbey of Hautvillers, a certain Pierre Pérignon (1639-1715), developed a system of blending, whereby the wines from different area in Champagne and made from different grape varieties, were blendend together. Although Dom Pérignon has been credited as being the inventor of sparkling Champagne, there is little real evidence to support this. There are claims that it was the English who put the sparke into imported Champagne wines, in the seventeenth century. On school of thought argues that warm weather caused the wine to undergo a secondary fermentation in the barrels in which it was exported.

  • Champagne - Part one

    ChampagneChampagne from France and Champagne region

     

     The wine of kings and princes and now the wine for every celebration, champagne is cloaked in glory and prestige and coveys to the world all that is French elegance and seductiveness. Its reputation has as much to do with its history as with its particular characteristics, which means, for many, that only wine from Champagne is the champagne; it is not as simple as that …

      The Champagne region, which is situated les than 200 km northeast of Paris, contains three Appellations, d'Origine Controlee: Champagne, Coteaux Champenois and Rose des Riceys, but the last two of these produce only around 100,000 bottles. This northrnmost wine-growing region in France extends chiefly over the Marne and the Aube regions, with small areas in the Aisne, Seine-et-Marne and Haute-Marne. The total vineyard area covers 32,710 ha, of which 30,891 ha were in production in 2014.

  • French Wine Regions

    Alsace wine region

    Alsace Wine RegionAlsace wine region with its villages, vineyards and towns linig the foothills of the Vosges mountains, is on of the most picturesque wine regions of France. This unique wine region of northeast France, which produces some of the greatest white wines in the country, still prides itself on making handcrafted wines and steers clear of outside investment.

    The wine region’s continental climate is exceptionally dry. Almost all Alsace wines are white wine and dry wines, whit exception of late harvest wines and some red wine produced from Pinot Noir.

    The soil of this wine region is extremly varied, with the best vineyards classified as Grand Cru.

     

    Burgundy wine region

    The hallowed ground wine region of Burgundy is home to the greatest Chardonnays and Pinot Noirs in the world. Sadly though, in recent years not all of the French wines made here have met the standards of their predecessor. Having said that, there are some smart up-and-coming young producers around and today Burgundy finds itself on a bit of a roll. Burgundy was one if the first French wines regions to be know for its wine outside its boundaries. Favoired by kings and queens, the much sought-after wines of Burgundy werw also a passion for Thomas Jefferson.

     

    Bordeaux wine region

    In terms of producing fine wines Bordeaux is the largest and most important wine region of France for the best French wine lovers. Throughout its long history Bordeaux wine region has had connections with England, and during a 300-year spell from 1152, was under English rule. Bordeaux wine region lies on the rivers Garonne and Dordogne, which join to become the Gironde, before flowing into the Atlantic. The climate, influenced by the sea and rivers, is mild, slightly humid and summers tend to be long and warm for this wine region.

     

    Wine Regions of FranceChampagne wine region

    The historic heart of Champagne wine region is Reims, about 93 milles (150 km) north-east of Paris. The geographical centre of the Champagne wine region is at Epernay, slightly south of Reims. Champagne is subdivided into four large areas: the Montagne de Reims, the Vallée de la Marne, the Côte des Blancs, and finally the Côte de Bar in the department of Aube, between Bar-sur-Seine and Bar-sur-Aube.

    Each of these wine regions has its own geographic indentity resulting from countless variations in position, sun-hours, contour, soil, and finaly area unique with its own character and potential. There are more than 300 different terroirs, here referred to as crus, each equally unique and the subject of countless village interpretations.

     

    Cotes du Rhone wine region

    Côtes du Rhône (English: Slopes or Hills of the Rhône) is a wine-growing Appellation d'Origine Contrôlée (AOC) for the Rhône wine region of France, which may be used throughout the region, also in those areas which are covered by other AOCs. In a limited part of the wine region, the AOC Côtes du Rhône-Villages may be used, in some cases together with the name of the commune.

    Côtes du Rhône are the basic AOC wines of the Rhône region, and exist as red, white and rosé wines, generally dominated by Grenache (reds and rosés) or Grenache blanc (whites). At the generic level, the official AOC Côtes du Rhône region stretches 200 km from Vienne in the north to Avignon in the south and from the foothills of the Massif Central in the west to the fore-slopes of the Vaucluse and Luberon mountains east of the town of Orange.

     

    Languedoc-Roussillon wine region

    Languedoc-Roussillon is a large wine region that sweeps across southern France from the Spanish border to the Rhône estyary. Commonly known as the Midi, it produces almost one third of all French wines and is currently a hot bed of innovation and exciting winemaking.

    Hillside locations are replacing the flatland vineyards which once produced an enormous amount of Vin Ordinaire. Emphasis is now being placed in lower yields, barrique ageing and more complex blending. Many Rhône varieties, such as Syrah and Grenache, are planted here to grow alongisde Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot ans Chardonnay.

     

    Loire Valley wine region

    In comparison of the rest of France, the Loire wine region has a cool climate. The area is capable of producing a wide range of wines, from light, dry, and crisp whites, to rosé, medium-bodied reds, and luscious dessert wines.   It is also a wine region where extremely good sparking wines are made. It was not until the 1940s that the Loire’s wines began to gain a reputation outside their local markets but since then, the region’s white wines, in particular, have featured on many restaurant wine lists.

     

    Provence wine region

    The French wine-growing region of Provence covers a large territory from Nice to Arles. It is no surprise therefore that Provençal wines vary so greatly in their colour, bouquet, and taste. The vineyards from this wine region are often widely scattered which makes working them more difficult. Most growers therefore belong to a co-operative to keep their costs down. The best wines generally come from smaller independent estates, which bottle their own wines in this wine region. The price of these wines is naturally dearer than those from co-operatives but the difference in quality justifies the extra cost.

     

    Corsica wine region

    Corsica wine region is situated on the Mediterranean island of Corsica. Located 90 km west of Italy, 170 km southeast of France and 11 km north of the island of Sardinia, the island is a territorial collectivity of France, but many of the region's winemaking traditions and its grape varieties are Italian in origin. The region's viticultural history can be traced to the island's settlement by Phoceans traders in 570 BC in what is now the commune of Aléria. In the 18th century, the island came under the control of France.

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  • German Mosel-Saar-Ruwer wine

    Mosel-Saar-Ruwer

    This widely known wine region stretches itself out along the Saar, Ruwer, and the Mosel rivers, from Saarburg by way of Trier to Koblenz.

    The vineyards are sited on steep slopes above the gently curving river Mosel, emanating a scene of timeless tranq uillity. The slopes chiefly consist of slate that is high in minerals, which is good for the wine's finesse. Admittedly not all the wines from this region are worthy of superlatives as unfortunately there are some very modest to almost undrinkable 'sugar' wines or lesser Mosels.

    The true Mosel wines are sensational with their rich nose, elegant character, and great class. Mosels come in a wide variety of styles from mellow, fruity, and amenable to more challenging, rich, and extremely aromatic. The best of them are undoubtedly the Rieslings, especially those from the famous wine villages of Bernkastel, Piesport, Wehlen, Brauneberg, Graach, Zeltingen, and Erden. Besides Riesling, Müller-Thurgau and the old-fashioned Elbling thrive here too.

     

    Ahr

    The Ahr is one of Germany's smallest wine regions. It is situated south of Bonn near Bad    NeuenahrAhrweiler. The rugged and impressive Ahr valley is a popular place for both nature lovers and walkers. Once the top of the Eifel has been reached, nothing tastes better than a cool glass of Portugieser red wine. The Ahr is after all a red wine area, although the volcanic origin of the soil, together with lots of slate makes it suitable for making first class whites too. The decision to make red wine though was rather more for economic than viticultural reasons.

    So many good white wines are made in Germany that the Ahr region, with a rather limited area available, decided there was more money to be made from planting blue grape varieties.

    German Baden Wine

    German Wine GrapesThe German wine region of Baden is in the south-east of Germany, forming a fairly long strip from the northern shore of the Bodensee by way of the famous Black Forest... Read more about German Baden Wine

    German Württemberg Wine

    German Wine GrapesThe vineyards of Württemberg are situated on hills above the Neckar and its tributaries. 

    Read more about German Württemberg Wine  

    German Rheingau Wine

    German Wine GrapesThe Rheingau is not only the geographical centre of the German wine industry, but also its historic centre.

    Read more about German Rheingau Wine 

    German Rheinpfalz Wine

    German Wine GrapesRheinpfalz is the most French of all the German wine regions.

    Read more about German Rheinpfalz Wine 

    {tab=    German Saxony Wine   }

    German Wine GrapesThis is one of the 'new' wine regions of Germany in the former East Germany. Together with the other 'new' region of Saale/ Unstruut they form the most northerly of the German wine areas.

    Read more about  German Saxony Wine 

     Two blue grape varieties, the Spatburgunder and Portugieser, yield velvet smooth, elegant, and fruity red wines here.

    These are complemented by Riesling and MüllerThurgau, which produce elegant, fresh, lively, and very aromatic wines.

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  • German Rheingau wine

    Rheingau

    The Rheingau is not only the geographical centre of the German wine industry, but also its historic centre.

    The relatively small region lies on the northern bank of the Rhine between Hocheim and Lorch. With the exception of the small Grosslagen of Daubhaus (north of Hocheim), Steil (near Assmannshausen), and Burgweg (near Lorch) the Rheingau forms one continuous area on the hills of the Taunus.

    The Rheingau is renowned for its wonderful landscape, its superlative wines, and its important role in Germany's history of wine. All the basisconcepts and terminology of present-day German wine law originated here. The first wines to be made from late harvested grapes were made here and also the first Trockenbeerenauslesen. Riesling thrives nowhere else as well as it does here on soil consisting of loess, loam, and weathered slate.

    Rheingau's celebrated Riesling is elegant, fruity, fresh, and of great class. The best wines often possess a firm, almost spicy character, and enough acidity to enable them to be kept for several years. In addition to the Riesling, the Rheingau is also world renowned for Spatburgunder wines from Assenhausen that are outstanding for a German red wine.

     

    Mittelrhein

    Four wine regions come together where the Nahe joins the Rhine: Nahe, Rheinhessen, Rheingau, and Mittelrhein. The last of these is an extended area from Bingen by way of Bacharach and Koblenz to the mouth of the Ahr, in the north of the region. The vineyards are sited on terraces on either side of the Rhine. The landscape is quite literally breathtaking.

    Wines from Mittelrhein need to be discovered locally. These wines are characteristic of their terroir, slate on the hills but more clay near the river. Riesling here is responsible for the best wines, which are elegant, fruity, and well structured, sometimes with quite high acidity. The Miiller-Thurgau and Kerner are more mellow but are also quite strongly acidic.

     

    Hessische Bergstrasse

    This region is relatively small and comprises a tongue of land between Heidelberg and Bensheim. The area is bounded by the Rhine in the west and the superb Odenwald in the east. The soil is almost exclusively loess, which is good for white wines. Here too little of the local production leaves the area.

     

    German Baden Wine

    German Wine GrapesThe German wine region of Baden is in the south-east of Germany, forming a fairly long strip from the northern shore of the Bodensee by way of the famous Black Forest... Read more about German Baden Wine

    German Württemberg Wine

    German Wine GrapesThe vineyards of Württemberg are situated on hills above the Neckar and its tributaries. 

    Read more about German Württemberg Wine  

    German Rheinpfalz Wine

    German Wine GrapesRheinpfalz is the most French of all the German wine regions.

    Read more about German Rheinpfalz Wine 

    German Mosel-Saar-Ruwer

    German Wine GrapesThis widely known wine region stretches itself out along the Saar, Ruwer, and the Mosel rivers, from Saarburg by way of Trier to Koblenz.. 

    Read more about German Mosel-Saar-Ruwer

    German Saxony Wine

    German Wine GrapesThis is one of the 'new' wine regions of Germany in the former East Germany. Together with the other 'new' region of Saale/ Unstruut they form the most northerly of the German wine areas.

    Read more about  German Saxony Wine 

     

    Riesling dominates here followed by the fragrant MüllerThurgau and subtle Silvaner (Sylvaner). Most wines are elegant and fruity with fine acidity. They are also very refreshing.

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  • German Rheinpfalz wine

    Rheinpfalz

    Rheinpfalz is the most French of all the German wine regions

    This region is the second largest in Germany in terms of area and the most productive. The best vineyards are in the north of the region, mainly around Wachenheim, Forst, Deidesheim, and Ruppertsberg, which is renowned for its superlative Riesling.

    In addition to powerful, full-bodied, aromatic, and elegant Rieslings, Rheinpfalz also produces a number of good whites made from Miiller-Thurgau, Kerner, Silvaner (Sylvaner), and Morio-Muskat. The rarer red wines from grapes such as Portugieser are mellow, mild, and fruity. Dornfelder grapes also yield excellent results.

     

    Rheinhessen

    This region, between Worms in the south and Mainz in the north is wedged between a loop of the Rhine and its tributary the Nahe. This is easily the largest wine area of Germany in terms of area of vineyards but second to Rheinpfalz in terms of production. The wines of Rheinhessen once enjoyed great fame, especially during the time of Charlemagne.

    Rheinhessen became famous at a stroke because of the excellent quality of the local wine from the vineyards surrounding the Liebfrau church of Worms. The wine, known as Liebfraumilch, used to be of extremely high quality but it is now permitted to be made in four areas: Rheinhessen, Rheinpfalz, Rheingau, and Nahe. Today's Liebfraumilch – of which the quality swings between reasonable and revoltingly sweet and shallow - unfortunately no longer has anything in common with the legendary wine. Rheinhessen soil consists of loess, chalk rock, and sand, offering great potential for inventive winemakers.

    The very best Rheinhessen wines undoubtedly come from the area around Nierstein, where the Riesling in particular delivers excellent results from the sunny terraces overlooking the Rhine. Riesling grapes here yield mild and fruity wines with a rounded and fulsome taste. Besides Riesling, there are also Miiller-Thurgau and Silvaner (Sylvaner) for white wines and Portugieser and Spatburgunder for reds.

    German Baden Wine

    German Wine GrapesThe German wine region of Baden is in the south-east of Germany, forming a fairly long strip from the northern shore of the Bodensee by way of the famous Black Forest... Read more about German Baden Wine

    German Württemberg Wine

    German Wine GrapesThe vineyards of Württemberg are situated on hills above the Neckar and its tributaries. 

    Read more about German Württemberg Wine  

    German Rheingau Wine

    German Wine GrapesThe Rheingau is not only the geographical centre of the German wine industry, but also its historic centre.

    Read more about German Rheingau Wine 

    German Mosel-Saar-Ruwer

    German Wine GrapesThis widely known wine region stretches itself out along the Saar, Ruwer, and the Mosel rivers, from Saarburg by way of Trier to Koblenz.. 

    Read more about German Mosel-Saar-Ruwer

    German Saxony Wine

    German Wine GrapesThis is one of the 'new' wine regions of Germany in the former East Germany. Together with the other 'new' region of Saale/ Unstruut they form the most northerly of the German wine areas.

    Read more about  German Saxony Wine 

    One of the finest German reds is the full and fruity classic Spatburgunder from the little village of Ingelheim, in the Grosslage Kaiserpfalz.{jcomments on}

  • German Württemberg Wine

    Württemberg

    The vineyards of Württemberg are situated on hills above the Neckar and its tributaries.

    The area starts near Tübingen and continues past the provincial capital of Stuttgart to Heilbronn and Bad Mergentheim. Württemberg is Germany's largest wine-growing region as far as red wine is concerned. About half the vineyards are planted with blue grape varieties.

    The soil here consists of sedimentary layers, chalk rock with fossilised shells, marl, and loess. Unfortunately the fine wines from this area almost never leave their area of production. Very fruity reds

    are made from Müllerebe, Spatburgunder, Portugieser, and Lemberger, while sturdy, powerful, and often slightly rustic whites are made from Riesling, Müller-Thurgau, Kerner, and Silvaner (Sylvaner) .

    Franconia (Franken)

    The vineyards of Franconia are on the hills overlooking the river Main as it runs through Würzburg and Aschaffenburg. The soil mainly consists of loess, sandstone, and chalk rock. Franconia has been renowned for centuries for two things: the Steinwein from Würzburg, which is so popular that all the wines from the region bear the Stein name, and the idiosyncratic but awkward green Bocksbeutel flagonshaped bottles. The shape makes them awkward to stack in wine racks intended for round bottles.

    Franconian wines are mainly produced from MüllerThurgau and Silvaner (Sylvaner) which yield very dry and sturdy wines with good acidity and fullbodied structure.

    Nahe

    Nahe lies to the west of Rheinhessen on either side of the river of that name. The soil in the north around Bad Kreuznach consists of loam and sand, while in the south it tends towards quartzite and porphyry. 

    German Baden Wine

    German Wine GrapesThe German wine region of Baden is in the south-east of Germany, forming a fairly long strip from the northern shore of the Bodensee by way of the famous Black Forest... Read more about German Baden Wine

     

    German Rheingau Wine

    German Wine GrapesThe Rheingau is not only the geographical centre of the German wine industry, but also its historic centre.

    Read more about German Rheingau Wine 

    German Rheinpfalz Wine

    German Wine GrapesRheinpfalz is the most French of all the German wine regions.

    Read more about German Rheinpfalz Wine 

    German Mosel-Saar-Ruwer

    German Wine GrapesThis widely known wine region stretches itself out along the Saar, Ruwer, and the Mosel rivers, from Saarburg by way of Trier to Koblenz.. 

    Read more about German Mosel-Saar-Ruwer

    German Saxony Wine

    German Wine GrapesThis is one of the 'new' wine regions of Germany in the former East Germany. Together with the other 'new' region of Saale/ Unstruut they form the most northerly of the German wine areas.

    Read more about  German Saxony Wine 

     Nahe bridges the gap in wine terms between the fragrant wines of the Mosel, the elegant ones from the Rheingau, and the milder ones of Rheinhessen. Miiller-Thurgau, Riesling, and Silvaner (Sylvaner) here deliver subtle and fragrant wines.

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  • Graves & Graves Superieures Bordeaux Wines

    Graves & Graves Superieures Bordeaux Wines

    Graves Bordeaux WinesIt is undoubtedly in this area, within and just outside the city of Bordeaux, that the region's winemaking roots run deepest. Graves wines, both red and white, have always increased the reputation of Bordeaux wines around the world. During the Middle Ages they were particularly renowned, and punishments were severe for those who cheated the public by passing off wines from other regions as being from Graves. Under the jurisdiction of Bordeaux, the vineyard at that time completely encircled the city.

  • Lazio Wine and Region

    Lazio Italian wine region

    Lazio wine ItalianThe region of Lazio extends from the Apennines, where it borders Umbria, Abruzzi, and Molise, to the Mediterranean. It is bounded to the north by Tuscany and to the south by Campania. The river Tiber plays an important role in the local wine-growing and the capital city of Rome is the region’s largest market. The majority of the vineyards of Lazio are close to Rome. The other Italian wine areas are found near Montefiascone in the north of Lazio, between Rieti and the border with Abruzzi, and north of Frosinone in the south of the region.

  • More wine regions South Africa

    Paarl-Wellington Region from South Africa

    Ellisrust African WineWe have come closer now to Cape Town - about 50 km (31 miles) away. This is the home of the KWV and is undoubtedly the most famous of the South African wine region (in part because of the annual Nederburg wine auctions and tasting sessions).

    The best known African wines from this region are the Sauvignon Blanc, Steen (Chenin Blanc), and Chardonnay whites, and Pinotage and Cabernet Sauvignon reds.

    The descendants of French Huguenots have turned their region into a place of pilgrimage. There is a Huguenot monument at Franschhoek (which translates literally as 'French corner') but also superb wines. In addition to the other well-known varieties, the French Huguenots had a preference for Semillon.

  • New Zealand

    New Zealand WinesWith new wineries coming on stream at an amazing rate, New Zealand seems to raise the standard year on year.  Dramatic improvments have been made with red wines, with Pinot Noir all the rage. The total area under vine in New Zealand has more than doubled since 1990, and its wine industry is one of the most forward-thinking in the world.

    New Zealand wine is exciting because of the number of wines being produced from slightly less predictable grape varieties. Pinot Gris, Gewürztraminer and Riesling perform well while beyond Pinot Noir, it may be suprising to find Syrah, Zinfandek and even Pinotage producing the goods and joining Cabernet Saugvinon, Cabernet Franc, and Merlot.

     New Zealand’s wine-producing regions strech from Auckland on the North Island to Central Otago, the country’s most southerly wine region on South Island. The country benefits from a temperate, maritime climate and a wide range of wine style are produced. On the North Island some of New Zealand’s top Cabernet-based reds are made in the Auchlakd/Henderson area. Waiheke Island, a short ferry journey from Auckland, enjoys a warm microclimate, which helps it ot produce rich Bordeaux blends. In Northland, a number of boutiqui wineries are making hight-class Cabernet-based reds and Chardonnay. Gisborne is Chardonnay country but also produces some promising Gewürztraminer.

    New Zealand Wine Map Hawke’s Bay is a region with a range of soils, including the Gimblett gravels, a 2,000- acre area of deep, stony soil. Full, rich Cabernet Sauvignon, Cabernet Franc and Merlot blends are made in good vitanges. The Chardonnay are some of New Zealand’s most powerful and Sauvignon Blanc tends to be more rounded than the Marlborough style, from South Island. On the southeastern tip of North Island, the tiny region of Martinborough, also known as Wairarapa, excels in fine Pinot Noir.

     On the South Island, Marlborough, the largest region in the New Zealand, has seen extensive expasion since the mid 1970s. The maritime climate and stony soils are perfect for Sauvignon Blanc, which has become synonymous with Marlborough. Distinctive Riesling, Chardonnay, Pinot Noir and sparkling wines are also made in this hugely fashionable region.

      Very slighty cooler than Marlborough, Nelson has been successful with aromatic whites while Canterbury, in the Waipara sub-region, is particularly promising. In the small, cool, scenic, mountainous region of Central Otago, Pinot Noir is the star, rivalling the best of Martinborough. Riesling and Pinot Gris also perform well here.

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