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  • Bordeaux wine region

    Bordeaux Wine Region

    Bordeaux Wine BottlesThe Gironde, in south west France, is the country’s largest Departement, and the home of Bordeaux wines, including claret, Britain’s favorite French wine for centuries. But while all claret is Bordeaux, not all Bordeaux is claret.

    Bordeaux is the largest region of fine wine production – red, white and dessert – in the world. The vines cover more than 500 square miles, split almost evenly between red and white grapes, and most of the wines have AC status. The vineyards run from the west bank of the Gironde estuary southwards to below the river Garonne.

  • Burgundy style and white wine

    Region and style from Burgungy

    Burgundy Wine GlassesMorey-St.Denis (Côte de Nuits): Deep colour, big bouquet and full fruity flavour. Age well.

    Musigny (Côte de Nuits): Smooth and stylish with velvety fruit. Will keep for ages.

    Nuits St. George (Côte de Nuits): Has improved recently. Spicy nose and big, rich plummy fruit flavour with touches of sweetness. Age well.

    Pernand-Vergelesses (Côte de Beaune): Can be silky- smooth and fruity, but often not. Best drunk youngish.

    Pommard (Côte de Beaune): Big and solid but classy, with plummy fruit. Age well.

  • Chablis and Beaujolais Wine Regions

    CHABLIS WINE REGION

    Grapes

    Chablis Fine Wine Chardonnay: The only grape allowed for Chablis producing a steely dry, green, acidic wine. The best wines are much richer, with depth and intense flavour although still bone dry.

    Sauvignon Blanc: Used for Sauvignon de St.Bris. The variety is not legal in Chablis which is why the wine has only VDQS status.

    Pinot Noir: Mainly used for red wine production, with some César, Gamay and Tressot.

  • Côtes de Nuits for Red French Wine

    Côtes de Nuits

    Cotes de NuitsThe Côtes de Nuits is world-famous for its red French wines and home to a great assortment ofterroirs and styles. The area starts in Marsannay and ends at Corgoloin. The soil is chalky with a lower layer of marl.

    The French red wine is somewhat heavy and rough when young but after several years ageing it becomes gentler, more rounded, and plump, with the aroma of red fruit, in particular cherry, blackcurrant, and redcurrant, with the occasional hint of prune, liquorice, cocoa, or coffee.

    The best known wine is the Rosé de Marsannay. This French wine is pale pink with some orange. The smell is fresh and pleasant while the taste is reminiscent of red fruit. The white French wine is very fresh, full-bodied, and impetuous but more supple and rounded when mature. The wine is intensely coloured, has a characteristic Chardonnay scent with exotic fruit, such as pineapple and grapefruit, and a big taste.

     

    FIXIN FRENCH WINE

    Fixin is best known for its red French wines. This is usually a fleshy, powerful wine with quite a lot of tannin when young which enables it to be kept. When young the wine is ruby red and has the nose of cherry, strawberry, and raspberry. When mature the scent is of plum or even leather.

     

    GEVREY-CHAMBERTIN FRENCH WINE

    Cotes de Nuits Wine LabelThis French wine is an attractive ruby red that is pure and clear. The characteristlc aromas are of black cherry, blackberry, and other small fruit, with an occasional hint of liquorice.

    It acquires a bouquet of spices, including nutmeg, and leather through maturing in oak which takes on earthy tones, bushes, wet leaves, and toadstools when it has reached a respectable age.

    This French wine is high in tannin but not so that it disturbs the taste, in part because of the fullness of the French wine. The taste is very full and fruity. The wine can be kept for 10-20 years after its harvest. The Gevrey-Chambertin Premier Cru Les Cazetiers is highly recommended.

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  • Hermitage - French Wine

    HERMITAGE

    Red Hermitage(French Wine) is somewhat harsh when young and requires some years rest; depending on the quality, this can be 5, 10, or even 20 years.

    Those with sufficient patience are rewarded with a very great wine with a sensual bouquet in which leather, red and white fruit, and wild flowers are present in the upper notes. The taste is largely of preserved fruit.

    Serve at 60.8-64.4°F (16-18°C). These white French wine is ready for drinking much earlier than the red but can also be kept for some time. Its smell is reminiscent of a sea of flowers with suggestions of vanilla and roasted almonds. It is a powerful, rounded wine with considerable aromatic potential. Drink at approx. 53.6°F (12°C) .

    CORNAS

    This red French wine is dark coloured and has an exciting bouquet in which red fruit, freshly-ground pepper, sweetwood, preserved fruit, and even truffles are present. The undertones are almost animalistic.

    ST-PERAY

    This is the only appellation which also makes sparkling wine. It is more of an amusing wine than an exciting one that is best drunk when young.

    GIGONDAS

    Gigondas is made from Grenache, supplemented with mainly Syrah and Mourvedre. The red wine is a wonderful colour and has a bouquet filled with fresh red fruit through to animal undertones and when older some fungal notes. It is a full, powerful, and well-balanced wine that is a little harsh when young. The wine needs keeping for a few years.

    The roses are fresh, cheerful wines with a great deal of extract. Drink these when young.

    VACQUEYRAS

    The whites and roses are drunk when young for any occasion. These red French wine with its characteristic scent of ripe red fruit such as cherry, and hint of sweetwood, has more power. Drink it at approx. 62.6°F (17°C).

    CHATEAUNEUF-DU-PAPE

    Although 13 different varieties of grape are permitted, the red wine is generally made from Grenache, Cinsault, Mourvedre, Syrah, Muscardin and Counoise, while the whites use Clairette and Bourboulenc.

    These red French wine has a very complex bouquet containing red fruit, leather, anise, sweetwood, and herbs, and equally complex taste that is rounded, unctuous, with a prolonged aftertaste. Wait for five years after harvest before drinking the red but consume the white wine while still young.

    The white wine is very aromatic and rounded with a nose that has floral undertones such as camphor oil and narcissus. True estate bottled Chiiteauneuf-du-Pape bears the arms of Avignon on the bottles: the papal crown and cross-keys of St Peter.

    LlRAC

    Lirac is growing in popularity. These are good French wines at a relatively low price.

     

    TAVEL

    Tavel is one of the finest roses of France. The pink colour tends towards terracotta tiles or even orange. Hints of apricot, peach, and roasted almond can be detected in the bouquet. Drink this wine at approx. 55.4°F (13°C) .

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  • La Grande Rue Grand Cru French wine

     LA GRANDE RUE GRAND CRU FRENCH WINE

    La Grande Rue Grand CruThis French wine is Jess well-known and less complex than its companjons from Vosne-Romanee. The appellation jg relatively recent (1992) and it has yet to prove itself as a gain for the area.

    This French wine is perhaps more representative than Cotes de Nuits and the climat is somewhat larger. The colour is a clear bright ruby red and the wine has seductive aromas of cherry, other small red and black woodland fruits, with the suggestion of herbs and spices in both the nose and taste. After a number of years maturing in the bottle, a bouquet develops of toadstools and other fungus. This French wine is a little rough and boisterous when young but becomes soft and pliant after a few years.

    Drink this fine and fairly inexpensive French wine between 60.8-64.4°F(16-18°C).

     

    NUITS ST GEORGES FRENCH WINE

    This French wine is granite red and has an jntense yet refined nose of cherry, wood, and spices which, when older, typically changes to suggestions of wild game. The taste is heady, fleshy, jwcy and velvety at the same lime. The aftertaste is often tilled with a great concentration of ripe fruit, with the suggestion of spices. Do not drink this French wine too young, certainly not before 10 years old, but also not too warm (60.8-62.6°F/16-17°C).

    The taste is heady, fleshy, jwcy and velvety at the same lime. The aftertaste is often tilled with a great concentration of ripe fruit, with the suggestion of spices. Do not drink this French wine too young, certainly not before 10 years old, but also not too warm (60.8-62.6°F/16-17°C).

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  • Loire Wine Region

    LOIRE wine and region

    Cheverny Blanc Loire FranceThe Loire is France’s longest river, flowing almost 650 miles from the foothills of the Massif Central in the Ardéche to the Atlantic Ocean west of Nantes. Fairy tale castles overlook the vineyards that flank most of the river and its tributaries. Near its source are the vineyards of Sancerre, Pouilly and the Coteaux du Giennois. Reuilly and Quincy mingle among the southern tributaries. To the east of Tours is Vouvray, and then Chinon, Bourgueil, Saumur, Muscadet and a scattering of smaller appellations as you near the sea.

  • Rhone Wine Region

    RHONE wine and region

    Rhone Winecellar FranceThe vineyards of the Rhone extend from just below Lyon as far south as Avignon straddling both sides of the river but not continuously. In the north, the vineyard belt is rarely more than a few hundred yards wide, while in the south the vineyards stretch out into the widening valleys.

    The northern vineyards are hot and rocky and all the famous red wines are produced from the Syrah grape, while in the south where many of the wines are blended there have been enormous improvements in the past few years.

  • South West French Wine Regions

    SOUTH WEST Wine Regions

    A massive wine producing area running from Bergerac to the west of Bordeaux, and stretching south to the Spanish frontier and south east to the Mediterranean.

    Red wine FranceGrapes

    Sauvignon Blanc.

    Semilion.

    Muscadelle.

    Cabernet Sauvignon.

    Cabernet Franc.

    Merlot.

    Malbec.

  • Veneto - Italian wine area

      The region of Veneto is a veritable paradise for lovers of nature, history and gastronomy. The area has been successful in agriculture for centuries.

    Stretching from the Dolomites in the north to the fertile Po valley and from Lake Garda to the Venetian coast, everything seems filled with the joy of living. The landscape is gently undulating, green and inviting. The climate is ideal, moderated and mildly continental in the north and Mediterranean in the south.

     

    BARDOLINO DOC

    The vineyards of this famous denomination are situated on alluvial soil deposited in the distant ice age between the right shore of Lake Garda and the city of Verona. Wine has been made here since before the time of the Roman empire. Bardolino is permitted to use the Corvina Veronese, Rondinella, Molinara, and Negrara (not less than 85%),supplemented if required to a maximum of 15 % with Bardolino,Rossignola, Barbera, Sangiovese, and Garganega.

    Bardolino is a ruby red wine that sometimes has a touch of cherry red in its colour. As it ages the colour darkens towards granite red. The wine smells fresh and fruity (cherry), sometimes with a touch of herbs, and it has a pleasant taste that is mellow and fruity with a discernible slightly bitter finish. The young wine can be a little sharp but this mellows quickly with age. Drink at 50-53.6°F (10-12°C) when young to 53.6-57.2°F (12-14°C) when mature.

    The Bardolino which originates from the historical heart of this region carries Classico on its label. Wines with a slightly higher level of alcohol (at least 11.5%) may be called Superiore. You may well encounter lighter coloured Bardolino wines (mainly in Italy). These are made with the short steeping method and are called Chiaretto. This type of wine is lighter in body than the normal Bardolino, but it is more full-bodied than most rose wines.

    Pinally there are also red Bardolino Spumante wines, with and without the addition of Classico and/or Superiore. This dark pink to pale red wine has a fine sparkle, a fairly muted bouquet, and a pleasant taste that is filled with juicy flavour. These wines have a slight bitter note in their finish. Drink at 50-53.6°F (10-12°C).{jcomments on}

  • Zimbabwe Wine

       Pew people will have heard of wine-growing in Zimbabwe and for those who have it will not be very positive. This fairly young wine industry is concentrated in the north-east of the country between the capital, Harare, and the border town of Mutare,

     in the wine areas of Marodera and Odzi, and the southern wine areas of Gweru and Bulawayo. Zimbabwe produces white, rose, and red wines.

    The white wines are made from grapes such as Clairette, Colombard, Chenin Blanc, and Riesling for dry wines and Muscatel and Hanenpoot for sweet ones. The white wines are certainly not for keeping. The first attempts have delivered reasonably fullbodied wines with fairly harsh acidity. Roses from Pinotage and Cinsault are fairly dry but less fullbodied.

     These too should be drunk young. The reds come from Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, Pinotage, and Cinsault. They are fairly full-bodied, quite dry, but lack backbone. It is not a wine to keep. It is to be seen if Zimbabwe can make pleasing and drinkable wines in the future.

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