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  • Aegean Islands Greek Wine

    Eastern Aegean Islands and Greek Wines

    limnos-muscat-aegean

    The Aegean is spread out to the east of mainland of Greece and the coast of Turkey and is filled with countless islands. Vines have been cultivated on these islands and wine made for at least 6,000 years and the sweet, luxuriant wines of Limnos, Lesbos, Chios, and Samos are legendary. Each island has its own microclimate and soil structure which ensure wines of an individual character undulating hills rising to 450 metres (1,476 feet) and valleys in which the wine-growing and agriculture is concentrated. This white Limnos wine is yellow- green in colour with a very fruity nose of fresh Muscat grapes. The taste is fulsome and rounded. Drinking temperature for this Greek wine is 10-12°C (50-53.6°F). Several acceptable red wines are also made on the island of Limnio grapes.

  • Belgian Wines and Regions

    Belgium Wine

    Maastricht Muler Thurgau and Riesling Belgium WinesBelgium already had a wine industry about a hundred years or so ago. After a long period of neglect Belgium has seen a significant re-emergence of wine-making in recent years. A wine culture has re-established a place of honor once more in a nation of beer drinkers. Only the cultivation of grapes in the open air is dealt with in this book, not the growing of grapes under glass.

     

    Hageland Appellation Contrôlée

    The Belgians have succeeded in gaining their own appellation d’origine contrôlée (AC) for Hageland, which is an area within the triangle formed by Louvain-Diest-Tienen in the Belgian province of Brabant. Vines were being cultivated here in the twelfth century, and possibly earlier. The area flourished in its heydays during the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries and there was still an active trade with neighboring Flanders and Holland in the sixteenth century.

  • Brazilian Wines

       Brazil is still a relatively unknown wine-growing area and Brazilian wines are seldom encountered, yet despite this Brazil does produce good wines.

    Brazilian wine-growing dates back to the sixteenth century when Don Martin Afonso de Souza, envoy of the Portuguese king, Don Juan III, planted the first vines at Santos El Baballero Bras Cubas. These vines had been brought from the island of Madeira.

    The Portuguese also took vines to the north-east of Brazil and sold the wine to the Dutch who controlled that territory at the time. The arrival of Portuguese wine-growers from the Azores in the eighteenth century briefly created a new impetus in the Brazilian wine industry. Because the European varieties were too susceptible to disease, the Brazilians chose North American grapes such as Alexander, Isabella, Catawba, Concord, and Delaware which are all varieties of Vitis labrus. The results of these experiments were not uniformly successful and the arrival of German, Italian, and French immigrants in Brazil brought both better knowledge and vines.

    Brazil has three large wine-growing regions: Rio Grande del Sur, Nordeste, and Vale de Sao Francisco. Many of the grapes are still grown as dessert grapes that can be harvested three times each year because of the favourable climate. Slightly less than half of the grapes are destined for wine production.

    Only about 20 percent of Brazil's vines are of the better Vilis vinifera varieties, while the others are hybrids and North American varieties, which are used for industrial wine. Acceptable to very good wines are made from Vitis vinifera varieties such as Merlot, Cabernet Franc, Cabernet Sauvignon, Gamay, Pinot Noir, Barbera, Riesling Italico, Chardonnay, Moscato, Semillon, Trebbiano, and Sauvignon Blanc. Brazil's potential as a wineproducing country can be shown by the many foreign companies investing in the industry like Moét et Chandon, Mumm, Remy Martin, Martini & Rosso, Domecq, and Seagram. Increasing numbers of Japanese companies are also entering the fray. It is clear that Brazil will soon become one of the major South American wine producers.

    Wine quality is getting better year by year. The control of hygiene and grape quality has been increased and the present wines are remarkably pleasing.

     A new era is just beginning for Brazilian wine. For those who wish to try Brazilian wine for themselves the Vinicola Miolo of Vale dos Vinhedos at Porto Alegre can certainly be recommended. It is probably Brazil's best wine at the present time.

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  • Cabernet Sauvignon Grapes

    One of the word's most popular black grapes, Cabernet Sauvignon's deep colour, blackcurrant aroma and flavour is the backbone of many is the backbone of many full-bodid red wines.

     An international traveller, successful in many parts of the world, Cabernet Sauvignon is easy to grow and just loves warm, free-draining soils. It reaches great heiths in Bordeaux's Haut-Médoc, as  well as in the Napa Valley, Australia, Chile, Argentina, and South Africa.

  • Carbonic maceration

    Carbonic maceration

    The general wine-making method in Beaujolais is carbonic maceration. The Gamay grapes are tipped into lare vats of timber, concrete or stain less steel as soon as possible after they are picked.

      The entire bunch including stems is left intact. The weight of the grapes themselves gently presses the grapes at the bottom and the juice from these (10-30% of the total volume) begins to ferment slowly. The sugars in the juice are converted to alcohol and carbon dioxide th ro ugh fermentation. The pressure of carbon dioxide increases and forces the 'cap' or grapes upwards. The soaking in carbonic acid gas causes the alcohol to break down natural colourants and tannin and these are absorbed in the subsequent fermentation.

    burgundy WINE *** french WINE

    The pressure of carbonic acid gas is highest at the top of the vat and the pressure causes metabolism within the grapes. These start to ferment internally, with alcohol being produced and the level of malic acid significantly reduced. Just as important though and a characteristic of this method of wine-making is that the presence of oxygen ensures the retention of o utstanding fruitiness in the aroma and taste. After the carbonic acid has soaked the grapes in a process that takes four to ten days, depending on the type of wine to be produced, the naturally pressed juice or 'vin de goutte' is drawn off. The remaining grape matter is then pressed gently and added to the initial tapping. Some cuvées may make wine consisting solely of the initially tapped natural pressing and these wines can usually be spotted by their 'heavenly' names on the label of 'Paradis'as the French call this sweet, very fruity, and aromatic french wine.

    burgundy WINE *** french WINE

     When this initial fermentation is completed a second fermentation occurs in which the harsh malic acids are converted to more gentle lactic acid. The young french wine is then ready to drink at once as Beaujolais Nouveau or undergoes further handling to become Beaujolais, Beaujola is Villages, or Crus du Beaujolais.

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  • Carmignano DOCG from Toscane

     

    CARMIGNANO DOCG TOSCANE WINE

    Carmignono Italian WineThis Italian wine was once part of the top Chiantis. After many years of relentless lobbying and continuing above all to make excellent Italian wine, the inhabitants of the small town of Carmignano managed first to see their pampered child elevated to its own DOC in 1975 and then eventually in 1990 to join the elite ranks of DOCG wines. The charm of this famous wine is probably created by the combination of the noble French Cabernet grapes and the mischievous and unruly Italian grapes.

  • Casteller DOC

    CASTELLER DOC

    These are reds and roses from Schiava grapes, possible supplemented to a maximum 20% with some Lambrusco, Merlot, Lagrein, or Teroldego.

     

    These wines are either ruby red or pink, very light in texture, and extremely mellow in taste. They are available as dry (Asciutto) or slightly sweet to sweet (Amabile). These wines keep well. Serve slightly chilled at 53.6- 57.2°F (12- 14°C) but cooler for the sweeter wines (46.4- 50°F/8- 10°C).

     *** the best italian WINE ***

    SORNI DOC

    There are two types of Sorni: whites from Nosiola grapes, possibly supplemented with Miiller-Thurgau, Pinot Bianco, and Sylvaner, and reds made with Schiava, Teroldego, and possibly Lagrein. Sorni Bianco is pale golden yellow with a green cast and barely noticeable bouquet or taste. It is refreshing though and can be served on any occasion. Drinking temperature is 46.4-50°F (8-10°C).

    Sorni Rosso has a more expressive nose and taste than its counterpart. It is an elegant, aromatic wine that is delicious throughout a meal. Choose a Scelto (auslese) for these are slightly higher in alcohol and more rounded. Drink at 53.6- 57.2°F (12- 14°C).

     *** the best italian WINE ***

    TEROLDEGO ROTALIANO DOC

    This wine from the Teroldego grape that is native to Trentino is virtually unique. The grapes prefer the flat land in the Rotaliana valley, to the north of Trent (Trento) . These grapes only develop fully with such great finesse in this one location. Wherever else these grapes are grown in Italy the results are moderate to atrocious. The Teroldego Rotaliano Rosso is very intensely coloured (ruby with glints of purple when young) and its characteristic nose is of violet and raspberry. A hint of bitter almond can be detected in the finish. In common with red Loire wines, Teroldego Rosso is best drunk when young or not before eight to ten years after the harvest. In the intervening years this wine often suffers from evaporation and becomes closed, revealing nothing of itself. Drinking temperature is 50-53.6°F (10-12°C) when young and 57.2-60.8°F (14-16°C) when mature.

    Teroldego Rotaliano Rosso Superiore has more body and is higher in alcohol and this is equally true of Riserva wines which must have at least two more years maturing before sale. Drinking temperature is 57.2-60.8°F (14-16°C).

    *** the best italian WINE ***

     There is also a Rosato (Kretzer) made from Teroldego which is an attractive pink to pale granite red colour, with an intriguing floral and fruity nose and delicate taste that is juicy and rounded. This wine also has a discernible finish of bitter almond. Drinking temperature is 50-53.6°F (10-12°C).

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  • Cava Vitrification Spanish Wine

    Cava Spanish WineIn Spain too, the grapes intended for production of Cava are carefully selected and harvested. The best grapes for making Cava are grown on very chalky soil at a height of between 656-1,476 feet (200-450 metres).

    The following grapes are used for the base wine: Macabeo (fruit and freshness), Parellada (floral perfumes) and Xarel-lo (acidity and alcohol). Sometimes a little Chardonnay is also added. For Cava Rosado the grapes used are Carifiena, Garnacha Tinto (Grenache Noir), Tempranillo, and Monastrell. Inland Cavas are usually made from Viura (Macabeo) grapes. Because it can become extremely hot in Spain the grapes for Cava are usually picked early in the morning. This Spanish grapes are pressed as soon as they are brought in from the vineyards.

    The juices are transferred to stainless steel tanks where fermentation takes place at a constantly controlled low temperature. After fermentation the wine is rested for a while before being sampled by the cellar master. The best cuvees are selected and blending takes place in great secrecy. This Spanish wine is then bottled and held in enormous cellars for a minimum of nine months but often for longer. During this period a second fermentation takes place in the bottle. Just as with Champagne, Saumur, or Limoux lots of tiny bubbles form.

     The bottles, which are stored on racks or rotating pallets, are manually or mechanically shaken to get the floating remnants of unfermented sugars and dead yeast cells to fall to the neck of the bottle. Here too the neck of the bottle is dipped into a special salt solution to freeze the sediment. When the bottle is opened the plug of sediment is forced out of the bottle by the pressure. The wine, which is now clear, is topped up with a liqueur (see main section on sparkling wines) and provided with a cork and retaining wires and cap. The wine is now ready to be shipped to the customers.

    Vineyards SpainMore than 90% of all Cava originates from Catalonia, particularly from Penedes. Two major companies control about 90% of the market. Freixenet (which also owns Segura Viudas and Castell Blanch) is the undoubted leader of the export market.

     The true market leader though in Spain is Codorniu. Cavas are generally somewhat less dry than French sparkling wines. They have that little bit of Spanish temperament. The price of the top quality Cavas is exceptionally low for their quality but one needs to be careful. Corners are sometimes cut, especially with the nine month 's period of maturing in the bottle.

    There have been cases for many years against brands which do not stick to the minimum nine months and whose wine is therefore not permitted to be termed Cava.There are officially only two different types of Cava: white and pink. The white Cava though is subdivided into a variety of different taste types.

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  • Champagne - Part three

    Champagne - Part three

    ChampagneChampagne The uniqueness of champagne is apparent right from the harvest itself. No harvesting machines are permitted, and everything is picked by hand because it is essential the the grapes get to the press in perfect condition. Rather than the hods used elsewhere, pickers carry small baskets to ensure that the grapes are not too crushed. Presses are set up in the heart of the vineyards to shorten the time the grapes are transported. Why is such care taken? Because champagne is a white wine made for the most part from o black grape, the Pinot Noir, and it is essential that the colorless juice should not be stained by contact with the grape skins.

  • Champagne - Part three

    Champagne

    ChampagneChampagne The uniqueness of champagne is apparent right from the harvest itself. No harvesting machines are permitted, and everything is picked by hand because it is essential the the grapes get to the press in perfect condition. Rather than the hods used elsewhere, pickers carry small baskets to ensure that the grapes are not too crushed. Presses are set up in the heart of the vineyards to shorten the time the grapes are transported. Why is such care taken? Because champagne is a white wine made for the most part from o black grape, the Pinot Noir, and it is essential that the colorless juice should not be stained by contact with the grape skins.

    Pressing has to take place as quickly as possible and in such a way as to collect the juice from different concentric parts of each fruit one after the other. This explains the particular shape of squashing the grapes and to facilitate the circulation of the juice, the grapes are piled over a very wide area but not very deeply. The skins of the harvested grapes must never be damaged. 

    Read more Champagne - Part three

  • Champagne - Part two

    More about Champagne

    Champagne   The particular demands of the champagne method, which takes a number of years (three on average and many more for vintage years), requires that over a milion bottles be kept in storage at any one time. According to the CFCE (Centre Francais du Commerce Exterieur), exportation of champagne represents an important part of total French wine exports.

       Wine has been made in Champagne since at least the time of the Roman invasion. The first wines to be produced were white; laster production was of red and then 'gris' (grey), which is white or nearly-white wine that comes from pressing black grapes. At an early stage the wine had the irritating habit of fizzing up in the barrels. Systematic bottling of these unstable wines was invented in England, to where, dissolve in the wine, and sparkling wine was born. Dom Perignon, the procurator of the Abby in Hautvillers and a forward-looking blending technician, produced the best wines at his Abbey; he was also able to sell them for the highest prices.

  • Champagne - Part two

    More about Champagne

    Champagne   The particular demands of the champagne method, which takes a number of years (three on average and many more for vintage years), requires that over a milion bottles be kept in storage at any one time. According to the CFCE (Centre Francais du Commerce Exterieur), exportation of champagne represents an important part of total French wine exports.

       Wine has been made in Champagne since at least the time of the Roman invasion. The first wines to be produced were white; laster production was of red and then 'gris' (grey), which is white or nearly-white wine that comes from pressing black grapes. At an early stage the wine had the irritating habit of fizzing up in the barrels. Systematic bottling of these unstable wines was invented in England, to where, dissolve in the wine, and sparkling wine was born. Dom Perignon, the procurator of the Abby in Hautvillers and a forward-looking blending technician, produced the best wines at his Abbey; he was also able to sell them for the highest prices.

    Read More about Champagne

  • Chardonnay White Grapes

    Today world's most popular white grape, Chardonnay express its varietal character in many forms: from the racy, steely, and nervy wines of Chablis, to the fuller-bodied, buttery rich wine made in the Napa Vally, California.

     Chardonnay grapes could be described as a 'winemaker's dream' because it's easy to work with and produces an amazing range of flavours- lemon, pineapple, peach, apple, honey, butter, bread, hazelnut, vanillia, and biscuit. The butter and creamy texture often associated with Chardonnay grapes is a signifiant sign that malolactic fermentation, which softens the 'green', underripe characteristics, has occurred. Malolactic fermentation will be encouraged in cool-climate wines that may well have excess acidity but is usually avoided in warmer climates, where acidity tends to be low.

     Chardonnay White Grapes Chardonnay grapes reaches its greatest heights in Burgungy's Cote D'Or, where the best wines, such as Meursault or Montrachet, gain sublime richness and complexity from the all-important limestone soil.

     This grape's rise to stardom has been dramatic, considering that in South Australia, no Chardonnay was planted until the early 1970s. There is a danger though, that the full-bodied, buttery, fruity Chardonnay with an oak flavour will become so popular that it may become difficult to convince consumers that a fresh, lively, oak-free version not only show the true characteristics of the grape variety, but is an alternative to the 'international style.'

      The Chardonnay grapes is grown in Burgungy, Champagne and the south of France, Australia, New Zealand, California, South America and South Africa.

     

    Sauvignon Blanc Grapes

    Sauvignon Blanc Grapeswhite-grapes

    This is an aromatic grape, which ripens early and is mostly grown in cool-climate vineyards.   Its range extends from featherweight tangy, dry white wines like Sauvignon de Touraine, to the ripe, almost tropical-like fruitiness obtained in California, where the less common addition of oak is often adopted and labelled 'Fume Blanc'. Sauvignon Blanc thrives on chalk or gravel soil.

    Riesling Grapes

    Riesling Grapeswhite-grapes

    The Riesling grape is seen by many as the most versatile variety of white grape in the world. It is without doubt a class act with a number of strengths, not least its ability to outperform Chardonnay in the longevity stakes.

    Semillon Grapes

    Semillon Grapeswhite-grapes

    Arguably one fo the most underrated verieties of grapes, Sémillon, Bordeaux's most widely planted white grape, makes delicious dry and sweet wines. With an almost honeyed texture, Sémillon is often partnered by Sauvignon Blanc to lift the acidity, although Australian winemakers also blend Sémillon Trebbiano.

    Chenin Blanc Grapes

    Chenin Blanc Grapeswhite-grapes

    An extremely versatile variety of grapes, Chenin Blanc is capable of making dry and crisp white wines that are great as an aperitif, through to medium, unctuous and sweet styles. Due to the keeen and vibrant acidity often found in Chenin Blanc grape, they make brilliant food wines and can stay in good shape for many years after the vitange.

    Other white grapes

    Other white grapeswhite-grapes

     This distinctive grape variety is known by its friends simply as Gewürtz but sometimes also as Traminer. It provides interese aromas, reminiscent of lychee, rose petals and spice.

     

    Shopping for wine can be quite a challenge, as there is often an immense range to choose from. Sometimes a little planning will be in your favour. Just knowing the type or style of a wine you want will make your buying decision that much easier. {jcomments on}

  • Chenin Blanc White Grapes

      An extremely versatile variety of grapes, Chenin Blanc is capable of making dry and crisp white wines that are great as an aperitif, through to medium, unctuous and sweet styles.

    Due to the keeen and vibrant acidity often found in Chenin Blanc grape, they make brilliant food wines and can stay in good shape for many years after the vitange. The grape seems to thrive best in marginal climates, such as the Loire Valley. and on chalky soils. Along the Luire Valley, in Vouvray, Montlouis, Anjou, Bonnezeaux, Quarts de Chaume, and Coteaux du Layon, Chenin can be hugely complex and of great character. The most amazing quality of Chenin Blanc wines is their longenity. Curiously, they become sweeter rather than drier with age. These are wines that can really benefit from bottle amutration and consequently make really good presents for christening of naming cereminies! The best Chenin Blancs are some of the wine world's most undervalued treasures.

    chenin blanc Less exciting wines are produced elsewhere. In South Africa for exemple, Chenin Blancs, known locally as Steen, often lack in complexity unless they are made from low-yielding bush vines, or the winemaking is in the capable hands of a conscientious producer. Old vine Chenin can take on another dimension when barrel fermentated or aged in oak.

      Chenin Blanc wines are made in the Loire, Australia, New Zealand, South Africa and California. The sweet wines are found in the Loire and South Africa.

     

    Chardonnay Grapes

    Chardonnay Grapeswhite-grapes

    Today world's most popular white grape, Chadonnay express its varietal character in many forms: from the racy, steely, and nervy wines of Chablis, to the fuller-bodied, buttery rich wine made in the Napa Vally, California. 

    Sauvignon Blanc Grapes

    Sauvignon Blanc Grapeswhite-grapes 

    This is an aromatic grape, which ripens early and is mostly grown in cool-climate vineyards.   Its range extends from featherweight tangy, dry white wines like Sauvignon de Touraine, to the ripe, almost tropical-like fruitiness obtained in California, where the less common addition of oak is often adopted and labelled 'Fume Blanc'. Sauvignon Blanc thrives on chalk or gravel soil.

    Riesling Grapes

    Riesling Grapeswhite-grapes 

    The Riesling grape is seen by many as the most versatile variety of white grape in the world. It is without doubt a class act with a number of strengths, not least its ability to outperform Chardonnay in the longevity stakes.

    Semillon Grapes

    Semillon Grapeswhite-grapes

    Arguably one fo the most underrated verieties of grapes, Sémillon, Bordeaux's most widely planted white grape, makes delicious dry and sweet wines. With an almost honeyed texture, Sémillon is often partnered by Sauvignon Blanc to lift the acidity, although Australian winemakers also blend Sémillon Trebbiano.

    Other white grapes

    Other white grapeswhite-grapes

     This distinctive grape variety is known by its friends simply as Gewürtz but sometimes also as Traminer. It provides interese aromas, reminiscent of lychee, rose petals and spice.

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  • Chianti Classico DOCG

     

    CHIANTI (CLASSICO) DOCG WINE

    Chianti Classico Italian Tuscany winesThe basic grape for this famous Italian wine is the Sangiovese grape (75-90%), supplemented with Canaiolo (5-10%), and the white Trebbiano Toscano, and Malvasia (5-10%). Only 5% of white grapes may be added to Chianti Classico. The white grapes are used to slightly reduce the harsh tannin that can be associated with the Sangiovese grape. A good Chianti is a very intense and clear ruby red colour. With age this tends towards granite red. The nose is very pleasing, full, and delicate. Connoisseurs can detect subtle notes of violets in it.

  • Cigales Spanish Wine

    Cigales Wine and Region

    Cigales Rosado Nuevo Spanish wineOnly 15 bodegas bottle Cigales. The area is situated on both sides of the Pisuerga river, between Valladolid in the south and Burgos in the north, with vineyards extending to a mere 2,700 hectares. Cigales has a long history as a supplier of fine rosado wines which were served at the Castilian court in the thirteenth century but it has only enjoyed DO status since 1991. Nowadays there are also excellent red Spanish wines from Cigales.

    The climate of Cigales is continental, but there is some influence from maritime winds which result in greater rainfall than the other wine areas of Castilla. The vineyards are sited both in the valley and on the slopes, at a height of 2,296-2,624 feet (700-800 metres).

  • Collio Goriziano/Collio wines DOC

    Collio Gorziano/Collio DOC Italian WinePicolit Italian Wine

    The Malvasia Istriana is pale gold, has a very fine and subtle nose, is smooth tasting and rounded with slight vegetal undertones. Drinking temperature for this Italian wine is 50-53.6°F (10-12°C).

    The Collio Chardonnay is generally better than most other northern Italian Chardonnays. It is pale gold in colour, delicate, dry, full-bodied, has light floral notes, is smooth and very pleasant. Drink this Italian wine is 50-53.6°F (10-12°C).

  • Conca de Barberá Spanish Wine

    Conca de Barberá Wine Region

    Barbera Spanish VineyardsThis Spanish wine region is wedged between those of Tarragona and Costers del Segre. The name ‘Conca’ in this case does not mean shell but combe or cwm, a valley surrounded by mountains. Conca de Barberá and its capital of Montblanc are bordered and protected by three mountain spines: Tallat in the north, Prades to the east, and Montsant to the south. Conca de Barberá’s soil is ideal for the production of the basic grapes for Cava. In recent years more money and time has been invested ii producing both rosé and red Spanish wines. J6WAGX3X62Z8

  • Croatian Wines

    Pošip Croatian wine

    Kiridzija Dingac CroatianThe island of Korcula is south of Hvar and at a similar latitude to Peljesac. The superb Pošip white wine made here is probably the best known Croatian wine made from the native variety of grape of that name and has been made from these grapes for centuries. The grapes are entirely hand picked. Pošip is a delightful full-bodied, rounded, and powerful white elevated from others by superb fruitiness in both inose and taste. Drink this Croatina wine at 10-12°C (50-53.6°F).

  • GAMBELLARA DOC ITALIAN WINES

    Recioto Gambellara ClassicoGambellara is a pleasing white wine made from the Garganega grape, supplemented as required with other non aromatic white grapes to a maximum of 20%.There is a slight bitterness in the finish. The heart of the Gambellara area is permitted to add the term Classico to the label. Drinking temperature for this Gambellara wine is 50- 53.6°F (10-12°C).

     

    GAMBELLARA RECIOTO DOC WINE

    The same grapes are used for the Recioto as for ordinary Gambellara, except that for this wine the grapes are first partially sun dried. This concentrates the sugars, flavour, and aromatic substances and produces a wine that is golden yellow with a strong nose of overripe grapes or raisins. The taste varies from sweet to very sweet and some of these wines may have a slight natural sparkle to them. Drink this Gambellara wine at 42.5- 50°F/6-10°C (the sweeter, the colder). There are also Gambellara Recioto Spumante and Gambellara Recioto Classico versions.

     

    GAMBELLARA VIN SANTO DOC WINE

    TPrime Brume Gambellara Classicohis is a superlative form of the Recioto. It is dark golden in colour and has an impressive bouquet of sweet raisins and these can also be discovered in the velvet smooth taste. This wine contains at least 14 % alcohol. Drink at 42.5- 46.4°F (6-8°C) or 46.4-50°F (8-10°C) for connoisseurs.

    PROSECCO DI CONEGLIANO-VALDOBBIADENEI

    PROSECCO DI CONEGLIANOI

    PROSECCO DI VALDOBBIADENE DOC

    These three wines originate from the north of a triangle formed by the towns of Padua, Vincenza, and Treviso. All three wines are made from Prosecco grapes, supplemented where required with not more than 15% Pinot Bianco, Pinot Grigio, or Chardonnay. There are two main types of Prosecco, Prosecco Frizzante is slightly sparkling, pale gold, very fruity, juicy, and particularly pleasing.

    The Prosecco Spumante is much more lively, fresh, fruity, and filled with flavour. Both wines are available as secco (dry, light, elegant, with a hint of bitter almond), amabile (slightly sweet and very fruity), and dolce (fully sweet and fruity). You may also encounter a Prosecco Superiore di Cartizze.

     This wine originates from a strictly defined area of Cartizze (near San Pietro di Barbozza in Valdobbiadene). The taste is virtually identical to the other Prosecco wines. Drink at 42.5- 46.4°F (6-8°C) for sweet wines and 46.4-50°F (8-10°C) for dry Prosecco.

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