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  • Alsace Wine Region - French Wine

    Alsace wine region

    Alsace with its villages, vineyards and towns linig the foothills of the Vosges mountains, is on of the most picturesque wine regions of France. This unique area of mirtheast France, which produces some of the greatest white wines in the country, still prides itself on making handcrafted wines and steers clear of outside investment.

     The region’s continental climate is exceptionally dry. Almost all Alsace wines are white wine and dry wines, whit exception of late harvest wines and some red wine produced from Pinot Noir. The soil is extremly varied, with the best vineyards classified as Grand Cru.

     

    Alsace grapes

    Alsace grapesMostly grapes of Germanic origin are grown here, but the resulting wines are much more expresive and fuller-bodied than those over the border. Often consumed with food, the main grape varieties, which are always mentioned on the label, are Gewürztraminer, Riesling, Tokay-Pinot-Gris, Muscat, Pinot Blanc, and Sylvaner.

    Some of the greatest wines of Alsace are the Vendange Tardives and Selection des Grains Nobles, which can live for over forty years. Outstanding wines include: Riesling Clos Ste., Hune from F.E. Trimbach, Domaine Zind Himbrecht’s Gewürztraminer Rangen Grand Cru, and Hugel’s Riesling Vendage Tardive.

    Alsace has the nost complex geological make-up of all the great wine regions of France. Some of the greatest wines of Alsace are the Vendange Tardives and Selection des Grains Nobles, which can live for over forty years. Outstanding wines include: Riesling Clos Ste., Hune from F.E. Trimbach, Domaine Zind Himbrecht’s Gewürztraminer Rangen Grand Cru, and Hugel’s Riesling Vendage Tardive.

    Alsace has the nost complex geological make-up of all the great wine regions of France.

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  • Champagne - Part one

    ChampagneChampagne from France and Champagne region

     

     The wine of kings and princes and now the wine for every celebration, champagne is cloaked in glory and prestige and coveys to the world all that is French elegance and seductiveness. Its reputation has as much to do with its history as with its particular characteristics, which means, for many, that only wine from Champagne is the champagne; it is not as simple as that …

      The Champagne region, which is situated les than 200 km northeast of Paris, contains three Appellations, d'Origine Controlee: Champagne, Coteaux Champenois and Rose des Riceys, but the last two of these produce only around 100,000 bottles. This northrnmost wine-growing region in France extends chiefly over the Marne and the Aube regions, with small areas in the Aisne, Seine-et-Marne and Haute-Marne. The total vineyard area covers 32,710 ha, of which 30,891 ha were in production in 2014.

  • French Wine

    France still seth the standards by which most of the world’s finest wines are judged, but ar far as store sales are concerned, australian wines are rapidly moving into pole position. 

    The French have certainly long been lovers of wine, from the red wine plonk for daily drinking of the vin ordinaire to the great wines from Bordeaux and Burgungdy. Life without wins is unthinkable to most of the French. Daily enjoyment of wine, with family of friends, or with a meal, is an essential pause in French life. Wine is the soul of the French always managed to save that soul.

     In contrast though, pick up almost any international wine list in a restaurant and French wines still dominate. It will be fascinating to see if French wines can fight back over the next decade.

    Wines France The system of Appellations d’origine Contrôlées (AC) used in France – which defines the region in which a wine’s grapes are grown, the varieties used, and the manner of production – may have its restrictions but it is still the first piece of information many people look for on a label. Vin de Pays, the lowest category of France wine, does not follow strict AC rules, but today it can hold many a pleasant surprise and bargain for the wine lover.

     

     Bordeaux  Burgundy   Alsace  The Rhône  The Loire Valley 

       Languedoc-Roussillon&Provence    Champage

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  • French Wine

    France still seth the standards by which most of the world’s finest wines are judged, but ar far as store sales are concerned, australian wines are rapidly moving into pole position.

     For centuries France has been regarded as the leading wine country. It was almost universally considered that only French wines were good. This was unjust because countries such as Italy, Spain, Germany, Hungary, and Greece have long made wine of top quality but the French managed to persuade the world that their wines had something special, that bit of extra quality.

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  • History of Champagne

     ChampagneChampagne is well known worldwide as a sparkling wine made ​​from selected grape in the Champagne region of France. For a successful Champagne requires a secondary fermentation of the wine in the bottle. Many of us use the term "Champagne" as a generic term for sparkling wine but most importers reserve this term only for all wines that are exported from the Champagne region and are produced in accordance with sparkling wine appellation.

    When we look at a glass of Champagne can easily observe characteristic bubbles. The most important grape varieties used for the production of Champagne are Pinot Noir...

  • Ideal Climate and Geology for French Wine

    That France countries to be the best known wine producing country of the world is probably due to the conditions for cultivating vines in its vineyards.

     Cotes de Duras French WineNowhere else in the world has such ideal circumstances for cultivating grapes as France for a good French wine. Winters are not too severe nor are summers too drym there is ample rain, and plenty of sun. The tremendous vatiesty of soil types also plays its part in centuries of successful viticulture in France: thick layers of chalk in Champagne, sedimentary layers with lots of shells in the Auxerrois (Chablis), marl, clay, pebbles and gravel in Médoc, bluer and grey shale in Muscadet, tufa in Anjou and Saumur, slate slopes in Collioure and Banyuls, warm boulders in southern Rhône for French wine.

    Furthermore there is sufficient water throughout France, indirectly from the sea or directly from the may rivers and underground reserves.

    Read more about French wine

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  • Languedoc-Roussillon&Provence - French Wine

       Languedoc-Roussillon is a large area that sweeps across southern France from the Spanish border to the Rhône estyary. Commonly known as the Midi, it produces almost one third of all French wines and is currently a hot bed of innovation and exciting winemaking.

      Hillside locations are replacing the flatland vineyards which once produced an enormous amount of Vin Ordinaire. Emphasis is now being placed in lower yields, barrique ageing and more complex blending. Many Rhône varieties, such as Syrah and Grenache, are planted here to grow alongisde Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot ans Chardonnay. Other well-known grape varieties can be seen on wine labels, perticularly from the Vin de Pay d’Oc, an area covering the whole of the Languedoc-Roussillon. Important appellations include Minervois, Corbiéres, Fitou and Côtes de Roussillon.

     

    Up and coming

     Provence lies to the southeast of Avignon abd extends to the Italian border. A popular holiday destination, mostly dry rosé and red wines are made here. With a Mediterrean climate and some favourable soil conditions, both Languedoc-Roussillon and Provence can provide consistency in terms of quality against price, without too much variation from one year to the next. Several Australian winemakers have now brought their own ideas and experience to this part of France, which is sometimes deschbed as ‘where the new world meets the old’. Dynamic and foeard thinking, they are shaping the future of these two historic regions. It is interesting to note that well-known French companies looking to expand their interests have also established wineries and contracts with local growers.

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    The wines of Maury, with flavours of sweet blackberry and a nutty, raisin-like richness, make an excellent partener to chocolate.

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      Some producers, such as Mas de Daumas Gassac, have successfully made and sold wines under a humble Vin de Pays, while reaching a level of quality and price that one would normally associate with more famous place names. Gradually, the south of France is no longer being seen as the bargain basement of bulk wine.

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  • Merchant power and Chateau system

    Merchant power and Chateau system for Bordeaux Wine

    Wine Bordeaux VineyardsBefore the chateau wine estate concept, land had been worked on crop-sharing basis. Slowly this feudal system changed from late seventeenth century onwards. Bordelaise brokers evolved habit of classifying and recording wines as per their growth or cru and prices that they fetched, with this, reputation of properties became established individually.

    In 19th century, there was a rise of négociant or the merchants in Bordeaux. Several negociants came from English origin and few firms had been established by Irish, German, Dutch, or Scottish businessmen.

  • Spain Wine

    Wine-growing

     

    The total area of Spanish vineyards is in the region of 1.2 milion hectares. That is enormous and about 300,000 hectates larger than either the France or Italian wine-growing areas.

    Yet less wine is produced than in either of the other two countries, at approximately 35,5 milion hectolitres, a vast 20 milion hectolitres less than France or Italy.

    The difference in production volumes in partly accounted for by the large proportion of Denominación de Origen wine. Spain produces relatively smaller volumes of vino de la tierra (country wine or vin de pays) than France or Italy.

    The majority of Spanich wines originates from Catalonia, Valencia, and La Mancha. Regions such as La Rioja, Aragon, Levante, and Andalucia produce quality wine in much lower volume.

     The lower yield can also be explained by the extremly hot and arid climate of southern Spain. The vines have to be kept low because of the extremes of weather so that the yield is little more than a few bunches per vine.

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  • Wine and country

     

      A quick glance at the shelves in a supermarket would make anyone think that wine was made all over the world.

     However, this is not the case as grapes require warmth and water in order to thrive. Of course, there are many other factors affecting the final quality fo a wine. Different countries, and indeed different regions, have acquired reputation for certain types of wine. For years, France was regarded as the true home of quality wine but now Australian and Californian wintages are among the best regarded.

    France    Germany    Italy    Spain    United States    Argentina and Uruguay    Chile  Australia   New Zealand    South Africa

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  • Wines from France

    The Wine from France

    Wine from FranceThe first cultivated vines were probably planted by the Greeks around Marseille, although it was the Romans who, over the course of 500 years, introduced the wine making tradition throughout the country. Experimentation with vines and wine making techniques took place hundreds of years ago, and people now generally accept which area produce the best grapes, what varieties are most suited to them, how they should be trained and so on.

    Today, France can boast more great wines than any other nation, and the grape varieties used to produce then have been exported around the globe setting the standards for others. Apart from the prestige region of Bordeaux, Burgundy, Champagne, Rhone and the Loire, there are scores of other regions where the quality of wine has improved almost beyond recognition in the past two decades, and which have not been hit by the rocketing prices which have put many top-name wines out of the reach of most consumers.