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  • Baden Wine

      The wine region of Baden is in the south-east of Germany, forming a fairly long strip from the northern shore of the Bodensee by way of the famous Black Forest (Schwarzwald), Freiburg,

     and BadenBaden, to Karlsruhe and Heidelberg, slightly south of the point where the Neckar and Rhine meet. Baden is the second largest wine region of Germany and it has a great diversity of wines to offer. Baden's soil chiefly consists of loess, loam, gravel, some chalk, and volcanic rocks.

    The full-bodied and rounded white wines are made from Miiller-Thurgau, Rulander, Gutedel, Gewürztraminer, and Riesling grapes. These wines often possess spicy and powerful bouquets.

     

    German Württemberg Wine

    German Wine GrapesThe vineyards of Württemberg are situated on hills above the Neckar and its tributaries. 

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    German Rheingau Wine

    German Wine GrapesThe Rheingau is not only the geographical centre of the German wine industry, but also its historic centre.

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    German Rheinpfalz Wine

    German Wine GrapesRheinpfalz is the most French of all the German wine regions.

    Read more about German Rheinpfalz Wine 

    German Mosel-Saar-Ruwer

    German Wine GrapesThis widely known wine region stretches itself out along the Saar, Ruwer, and the Mosel rivers, from Saarburg by way of Trier to Koblenz.. 

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    German Saxony Wine

    German Wine GrapesThis is one of the 'new' wine regions of Germany in the former East Germany. Together with the other 'new' region of Saale/ Unstruut they form the most northerly of the German wine areas.

    Read more about  German Saxony Wine 

     

     Spatburgunder is used to make velvet smooth red wines that are lively and rounded, and also the gloriously refreshing Weissherbst. {jcomments on}

  • German Mosel-Saar-Ruwer wine

    Mosel-Saar-Ruwer

    This widely known wine region stretches itself out along the Saar, Ruwer, and the Mosel rivers, from Saarburg by way of Trier to Koblenz.

    The vineyards are sited on steep slopes above the gently curving river Mosel, emanating a scene of timeless tranq uillity. The slopes chiefly consist of slate that is high in minerals, which is good for the wine's finesse. Admittedly not all the wines from this region are worthy of superlatives as unfortunately there are some very modest to almost undrinkable 'sugar' wines or lesser Mosels.

    The true Mosel wines are sensational with their rich nose, elegant character, and great class. Mosels come in a wide variety of styles from mellow, fruity, and amenable to more challenging, rich, and extremely aromatic. The best of them are undoubtedly the Rieslings, especially those from the famous wine villages of Bernkastel, Piesport, Wehlen, Brauneberg, Graach, Zeltingen, and Erden. Besides Riesling, Müller-Thurgau and the old-fashioned Elbling thrive here too.

     

    Ahr

    The Ahr is one of Germany's smallest wine regions. It is situated south of Bonn near Bad    NeuenahrAhrweiler. The rugged and impressive Ahr valley is a popular place for both nature lovers and walkers. Once the top of the Eifel has been reached, nothing tastes better than a cool glass of Portugieser red wine. The Ahr is after all a red wine area, although the volcanic origin of the soil, together with lots of slate makes it suitable for making first class whites too. The decision to make red wine though was rather more for economic than viticultural reasons.

    So many good white wines are made in Germany that the Ahr region, with a rather limited area available, decided there was more money to be made from planting blue grape varieties.

    German Baden Wine

    German Wine GrapesThe German wine region of Baden is in the south-east of Germany, forming a fairly long strip from the northern shore of the Bodensee by way of the famous Black Forest... Read more about German Baden Wine

    German Württemberg Wine

    German Wine GrapesThe vineyards of Württemberg are situated on hills above the Neckar and its tributaries. 

    Read more about German Württemberg Wine  

    German Rheingau Wine

    German Wine GrapesThe Rheingau is not only the geographical centre of the German wine industry, but also its historic centre.

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    German Rheinpfalz Wine

    German Wine GrapesRheinpfalz is the most French of all the German wine regions.

    Read more about German Rheinpfalz Wine 

    {tab=    German Saxony Wine   }

    German Wine GrapesThis is one of the 'new' wine regions of Germany in the former East Germany. Together with the other 'new' region of Saale/ Unstruut they form the most northerly of the German wine areas.

    Read more about  German Saxony Wine 

     Two blue grape varieties, the Spatburgunder and Portugieser, yield velvet smooth, elegant, and fruity red wines here.

    These are complemented by Riesling and MüllerThurgau, which produce elegant, fresh, lively, and very aromatic wines.

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  • German Saxony (Sachsen) Wine

    Saxony (Sachsen)

    This is one of the 'new' wine regions of Germany in the former East Germany. Together with the other 'new' region of Saale/ Unstruut they form the most northerly of the German wine areas.

    Sachsen is the furthest east along the banks of the Elbe, on either side of Dresden.

    It is a very small area with several scattered vineyards sited between Pillnitz and Diesbar Seusslitz, with the towns of Meissen and Radebeul at its centre. The soil of these vineyards is extremely varied (including sand, porphyry, and loam) . Müller-Thurgau, Weissburgunder, and Traminer produce dry and fruity wines here with a refreshing degree of acidity. The rare local wines are light and mellow and the Elbtal-Sekt is of very acceptable quality.

    Saalel Unstrut

    This small area to the south of Halle is the most northerly wine area of Germany and with the United  Kingdom, the most northerly of Europe. The severe continental climate forces the growers to harvest their grapes as early and quickly as possible. Pew sweet wines are therefore likely to be encountered, certainly no late harvested types. Most of them are dry and often pretty tart.

    White grapes particularly thrive on a soil of sandstone with plenty of fossilised shells, but the rare reds prove the potential ofthe area. Müller-Thurgau is undemanding and productive and here it successfully produces fresh vegetal wines with a pleasing fragrance of grapefruit. The Silvaner (Sylvaner) are better though, producing mellow and fresh wines with milder acidity and nose of citrus fruit.

    The best places are reserved for Riesling, which yield especially good results on chalk soils. The Riesling is fresh, powerful, full-bodied, with a characteristic nose of pear.

     

    German Baden Wine

    German Wine GrapesThe German wine region of Baden is in the south-east of Germany, forming a fairly long strip from the northern shore of the Bodensee by way of the famous Black Forest... Read more about German Baden Wine

    German Württemberg Wine

    German Wine GrapesThe vineyards of Württemberg are situated on hills above the Neckar and its tributaries. 

    Read more about German Württemberg Wine  

    German Rheingau Wine

    German Wine GrapesThe Rheingau is not only the geographical centre of the German wine industry, but also its historic centre.

    Read more about German Rheingau Wine 

    German Rheinpfalz Wine

    German Wine GrapesRheinpfalz is the most French of all the German wine regions.

    Read more about German Rheinpfalz Wine 

    German Mosel-Saar-Ruwer

    German Wine GrapesThis widely known wine region stretches itself out along the Saar, Ruwer, and the Mosel rivers, from Saarburg by way of Trier to Koblenz.. 

    Read more about German Mosel-Saar-Ruwer

     Other grapes such as Weissburgunder (green apple) and Traminer (mellow and rounded) , yield reasonable wines for easy and early drinking. Portugieser reds have a seductive scent of raspberry but are often a bit too rigid.

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  • German Wine

       Some of the greatest white wines in the world come from Germany. When made from the Riesling grape, by a well-respcted grower, German wines can be extremly complex and deliver immense satisfaction.

     The cool climate is just one the factors explaining why German wines are some of the most difficult to make. Several of the vineyards lie at the northen limit for wine production. Nonetheless, in good years the grapes ripen slowly and can provide a wonderful balance between fruit and acidity. Winemaking was introduced to the region by the Romans who observed where the snow first melted, indicating where grapes might succesfully ripen.

    Germany Wineyards A grading system evolved, which linked quality to grape ripeness, rather then vineyard location. This notion has been challenged by several respected grawers, who argue that precise location is equally important. Traditionally, QMP wines, are made without chaptalisation and are categorised depending on the degree of natural grape sugar at the time of harvest.

     The categories are as follows:

    KABINETT: very light and perfect as an apertif.

    SPÄTLESE: much sweeter, with some noble rot apparent in some cases.

    BERENAUSLESE: rich, intense, sweet wines.

    TROCHENBEERENAUSLESE: made form individual handpicked verries, 100 per cent noble rot. The richest wines, at best balanced with crisp acidity,

    EISWEIN: picked at BERENAUSLESE ripeness or above when frozen. Sweet, intense and with pinpoint acidity.

     

    German regions for winemakers

     Tow new generic labelling terms have been introduced: ‘Classic’ and ‘Selection’. Linked to dry wines made from traditional grapes, ‘selection’ indicates that the wine cames from an individual wineyard in one specific region. Germany’s wine regions of note include Mosel-Saar-Ruwer, Rheingau, Nahe and Pfalz. The steep, south-facing vineyards of Mosel-Saar-Ruwer overlook the River Mosel and its triburaries, the Saar and the Ruwer. Skate siuk us important here. Mosel wines,traditionally sold in tall, green bettles, are pale in colour, light in body, with racy acidity and elegance.

     Rheingau wines are fuller in style, with the river Rhine being influential. The wineyards, such as the Rudesheimer Berg, are also angled steeply. Halfway in style between a Mosel and Rhein, Nahe wines are fresh, clean and sometimes ‘minerally’. Wines from the Pfalz region are growing in popularity. Pfalz haz the warmest climate of Germany’s wine-growing regins and is home to some of Germany’s most innovative winemakers and some exciting wines. Certain wines, such as those from the Lingenfleder estate, exce. However, Pfalz is also home to a great deal of Liefraumilch production.

     

      Top-quality estate wines from Germany once fetched higher prices than firt-growth Bordeaux! {jcomments on}

  • German Wine

    More about German Wine

     Germany takes sixth place among the wineproducing nations of the world. Much of the production is intended for export, while Germany itself imports huge volumes of wine. This demonstrates the complexity of the German position. It seems as though the best German wines – but unfortunately also some of the worst - disappear into export markets while the Germans themselves tend to prefer beer or imported wines.

    Compared with a country like France, the consumption of wine in Germany is quite low. Changes are also apparent though in Germany. Although the German government has always maintained that the German system of wine control was watertight and the best in Europe, in reality things were sometimes not right with the cheaper German wines.

    Some wine traders were clearly more interested in quick profits than being ambassadors for the German wine industry. Creations with names such as 'Alte Wein Tradition' and 'Kellergeister' have done much to damage the reputation of German wines. On the other hand with the absurd prices of Bordeaux wines, in particular those of Sauternes, increasing numbers of people have been looking for cheaper alternatives. These can be found in Germany at prices that are quite attractive.

    The demand for good quality but affordable German wine has increased in the past decade or so. The demand for dry German wines has also grown explosively. Most of the growers were quickly able to adapt themselves to the market situation. Growers constantly seek to find ways to guarantee the wine's quality while keeping the prices acceptable for everyone.

    About German Wine...

  • German wine-growing and regions

    German Wine-growing

    German WinesAlthough a few wine-makers succeed in making excellent red wines, German is white wine country, because of its climate. Although the quality of red German wines has improved, the price charged for the level of quality available is somewhat on the high side. Slightly more than 85% of the area cultivated by vines in Germany is planted with white grape varieties. Before the reunification of Germany the proportion of red wine grapes had risen sharply from 13% in 1984 to almost 19% in 1994. Because the winegrowing areas of the former East Germany mainly grew white varieties, the proportion has now decreased slightly. The choice of grapes grown has also shifted in favour of better quality. Hence the very productive MüllerThurgau is losing ground in favour of Riesling.

  • German Württemberg Wine

    Württemberg

    The vineyards of Württemberg are situated on hills above the Neckar and its tributaries.

    The area starts near Tübingen and continues past the provincial capital of Stuttgart to Heilbronn and Bad Mergentheim. Württemberg is Germany's largest wine-growing region as far as red wine is concerned. About half the vineyards are planted with blue grape varieties.

    The soil here consists of sedimentary layers, chalk rock with fossilised shells, marl, and loess. Unfortunately the fine wines from this area almost never leave their area of production. Very fruity reds

    are made from Müllerebe, Spatburgunder, Portugieser, and Lemberger, while sturdy, powerful, and often slightly rustic whites are made from Riesling, Müller-Thurgau, Kerner, and Silvaner (Sylvaner) .

    Franconia (Franken)

    The vineyards of Franconia are on the hills overlooking the river Main as it runs through Würzburg and Aschaffenburg. The soil mainly consists of loess, sandstone, and chalk rock. Franconia has been renowned for centuries for two things: the Steinwein from Würzburg, which is so popular that all the wines from the region bear the Stein name, and the idiosyncratic but awkward green Bocksbeutel flagonshaped bottles. The shape makes them awkward to stack in wine racks intended for round bottles.

    Franconian wines are mainly produced from MüllerThurgau and Silvaner (Sylvaner) which yield very dry and sturdy wines with good acidity and fullbodied structure.

    Nahe

    Nahe lies to the west of Rheinhessen on either side of the river of that name. The soil in the north around Bad Kreuznach consists of loam and sand, while in the south it tends towards quartzite and porphyry. 

    German Baden Wine

    German Wine GrapesThe German wine region of Baden is in the south-east of Germany, forming a fairly long strip from the northern shore of the Bodensee by way of the famous Black Forest... Read more about German Baden Wine

     

    German Rheingau Wine

    German Wine GrapesThe Rheingau is not only the geographical centre of the German wine industry, but also its historic centre.

    Read more about German Rheingau Wine 

    German Rheinpfalz Wine

    German Wine GrapesRheinpfalz is the most French of all the German wine regions.

    Read more about German Rheinpfalz Wine 

    German Mosel-Saar-Ruwer

    German Wine GrapesThis widely known wine region stretches itself out along the Saar, Ruwer, and the Mosel rivers, from Saarburg by way of Trier to Koblenz.. 

    Read more about German Mosel-Saar-Ruwer

    German Saxony Wine

    German Wine GrapesThis is one of the 'new' wine regions of Germany in the former East Germany. Together with the other 'new' region of Saale/ Unstruut they form the most northerly of the German wine areas.

    Read more about  German Saxony Wine 

     Nahe bridges the gap in wine terms between the fragrant wines of the Mosel, the elegant ones from the Rheingau, and the milder ones of Rheinhessen. Miiller-Thurgau, Riesling, and Silvaner (Sylvaner) here deliver subtle and fragrant wines.

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