Wine Searcher

  • Cotes du Roussillon for French Wines

      The soils of the vineyards of Roussillon are very complex and variable: chalk, clay, shale, gneis, granite, and alluvial deposits, causing great variety in the types and tastes of these French wines. The climate is extremely hot in summer and mild in winter but rain does not fall evenly throughout the year. An entire vineyard can be destroyed by a cloudburst. Winemaking in Roussillon in the past decades has changed greatly with significant improvement of the regulation of temperature before and during fermentation. The white French wine is light, fresh, and fruity: drink it at 10- 12°C (50-53.6°F) .

    The rose is produced by the saignee methode, meaning that the red French wine is drawn off early and then vinified as white wine. Because the wine is drawn off so quickly, the grape skins have had just enough time to impart their wonderful red colour without adding tannin to the wine. This rose is very fruity. Drink this taste French wine at 12°C (53.6°F) .

    There are two different types of red wine. A light wine is often produced by steeping in carbonic acid gas maceration carbonique), which is fruity, slightly spicy, and particularly pleasing. For a good taste drink this French wine at 12- 14°C(53 .6-57.2°F) .

    The traditionally made red French wine is stronger and more rounded. The bouquet tends towards red cherry, plums, preserved fruit, and spices. This French wine can be kept for some time because it is aged in wood. Drink this French wine at 14- 16°C (57 .2- 60.8°F) .

     

    Cotes du Roussillon Villages

    The difference of this red French wine from the other Cotes du Roussillon wines is its specific terroirs, which mainly consist of the sides of hills or terraces of shale, chalk, and granite. The grapes used are the same as ordinary Cotes du Roussillon but the output per hectare is much lower. The appellation Cotes du Roussillon Villages may be used by 32 communes in the north of the department on vineyards extending to 2,000 hectares. These French wines are stronger, more powerful, and more complex than Cotes du Roussillon, and can be kept longer. For a good taste serve this French wine at 16°C (60.8°F) .

    Among the 32 communes of Cotes du Roussillon Villages, there are four which are permitted to bear their name on the label, in recognition of their higher quality.

    {jcomments on}

  • Languedoc-Roussillon&Provence - French Wine

       Languedoc-Roussillon is a large area that sweeps across southern France from the Spanish border to the Rhône estyary. Commonly known as the Midi, it produces almost one third of all French wines and is currently a hot bed of innovation and exciting winemaking.

      Hillside locations are replacing the flatland vineyards which once produced an enormous amount of Vin Ordinaire. Emphasis is now being placed in lower yields, barrique ageing and more complex blending. Many Rhône varieties, such as Syrah and Grenache, are planted here to grow alongisde Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot ans Chardonnay. Other well-known grape varieties can be seen on wine labels, perticularly from the Vin de Pay d’Oc, an area covering the whole of the Languedoc-Roussillon. Important appellations include Minervois, Corbiéres, Fitou and Côtes de Roussillon.

     

    Up and coming

     Provence lies to the southeast of Avignon abd extends to the Italian border. A popular holiday destination, mostly dry rosé and red wines are made here. With a Mediterrean climate and some favourable soil conditions, both Languedoc-Roussillon and Provence can provide consistency in terms of quality against price, without too much variation from one year to the next. Several Australian winemakers have now brought their own ideas and experience to this part of France, which is sometimes deschbed as ‘where the new world meets the old’. Dynamic and foeard thinking, they are shaping the future of these two historic regions. It is interesting to note that well-known French companies looking to expand their interests have also established wineries and contracts with local growers.

    {slide=Did you know?}

    The wines of Maury, with flavours of sweet blackberry and a nutty, raisin-like richness, make an excellent partener to chocolate.

    {/slides}

     
      Some producers, such as Mas de Daumas Gassac, have successfully made and sold wines under a humble Vin de Pays, while reaching a level of quality and price that one would normally associate with more famous place names. Gradually, the south of France is no longer being seen as the bargain basement of bulk wine.

    {jcomments on}