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  • Bianco Pisano and Chianti DOCG Toscany Region

     

    BIANCO PISANO Di SAN TORPE DOC WINE

    Tuscany Italy wine bottlesThis Italian wine has been a DOC since 1980. The area is to the south east of Pisa. Outstanding white wines have been made for centuries from the Trebbiano grape and today these contain 75-100% of this variety. The local Vin Santo also enjoys great fame in Italy. The fresh Bianco Pisano has a very subtle taste. Drinking temperature for this Italian wine is 46.4- 50.0°F (8-10°C). The Vin Santo is amber coloured, aromatic, fulsome, mellow, and sweet. Drinking temperature for this Italian wine is 42.8-46.4°F(6-8°C).

  • Chianti Classico DOCG

     

    CHIANTI (CLASSICO) DOCG WINE

    Chianti Classico Italian Tuscany winesThe basic grape for this famous Italian wine is the Sangiovese grape (75-90%), supplemented with Canaiolo (5-10%), and the white Trebbiano Toscano, and Malvasia (5-10%). Only 5% of white grapes may be added to Chianti Classico. The white grapes are used to slightly reduce the harsh tannin that can be associated with the Sangiovese grape. A good Chianti is a very intense and clear ruby red colour. With age this tends towards granite red. The nose is very pleasing, full, and delicate. Connoisseurs can detect subtle notes of violets in it.

  • French Wine

    France still seth the standards by which most of the world’s finest wines are judged, but ar far as store sales are concerned, australian wines are rapidly moving into pole position. 

    The French have certainly long been lovers of wine, from the red wine plonk for daily drinking of the vin ordinaire to the great wines from Bordeaux and Burgungdy. Life without wins is unthinkable to most of the French. Daily enjoyment of wine, with family of friends, or with a meal, is an essential pause in French life. Wine is the soul of the French always managed to save that soul.

     In contrast though, pick up almost any international wine list in a restaurant and French wines still dominate. It will be fascinating to see if French wines can fight back over the next decade.

    Wines France The system of Appellations d’origine Contrôlées (AC) used in France – which defines the region in which a wine’s grapes are grown, the varieties used, and the manner of production – may have its restrictions but it is still the first piece of information many people look for on a label. Vin de Pays, the lowest category of France wine, does not follow strict AC rules, but today it can hold many a pleasant surprise and bargain for the wine lover.

     

     Bordeaux  Burgundy   Alsace  The Rhône  The Loire Valley 

       Languedoc-Roussillon&Provence    Champage

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  • Languedoc-Roussillon&Provence - French Wine

       Languedoc-Roussillon is a large area that sweeps across southern France from the Spanish border to the Rhône estyary. Commonly known as the Midi, it produces almost one third of all French wines and is currently a hot bed of innovation and exciting winemaking.

      Hillside locations are replacing the flatland vineyards which once produced an enormous amount of Vin Ordinaire. Emphasis is now being placed in lower yields, barrique ageing and more complex blending. Many Rhône varieties, such as Syrah and Grenache, are planted here to grow alongisde Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot ans Chardonnay. Other well-known grape varieties can be seen on wine labels, perticularly from the Vin de Pay d’Oc, an area covering the whole of the Languedoc-Roussillon. Important appellations include Minervois, Corbiéres, Fitou and Côtes de Roussillon.

     

    Up and coming

     Provence lies to the southeast of Avignon abd extends to the Italian border. A popular holiday destination, mostly dry rosé and red wines are made here. With a Mediterrean climate and some favourable soil conditions, both Languedoc-Roussillon and Provence can provide consistency in terms of quality against price, without too much variation from one year to the next. Several Australian winemakers have now brought their own ideas and experience to this part of France, which is sometimes deschbed as ‘where the new world meets the old’. Dynamic and foeard thinking, they are shaping the future of these two historic regions. It is interesting to note that well-known French companies looking to expand their interests have also established wineries and contracts with local growers.

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    The wines of Maury, with flavours of sweet blackberry and a nutty, raisin-like richness, make an excellent partener to chocolate.

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      Some producers, such as Mas de Daumas Gassac, have successfully made and sold wines under a humble Vin de Pays, while reaching a level of quality and price that one would normally associate with more famous place names. Gradually, the south of France is no longer being seen as the bargain basement of bulk wine.

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  • The nine AC French wines

    CÔTEAUX DU CAP CORSE

    This is a minuscule wine-growing appellation area with a mere 30 hectares, situated on mountainous slopes to the north of Bastia. Red, rose, but chiefly white French wines are made here. The white, based on the Vermentinu grape, is excellent and very refined.

     

    MUSCAT DU CAP CORSE

    This French wine is produced in the same mountainous areas as the Côteaux du Cap Corse and also in the Patrimonio area. This appellation was officially recognised in 1993, although the local Muscat wines have enjoyed international fame for centuries. It is fine and very aromatic French wine.

    The best Muscat is made from grapes that are picked very late, ripened and dried under the sun in small boxes. This makes a full-flavoured, very aromatic wine, that is fatty and strong. It can be readily laid

    down and should be drunk chilled to approx. 8°C (46.4°F).

     

    PATRIMONIO

    This is one of the best known and often also best French wines of Corsica. Red and rose wines are produced from the Niellucciu group and the Vermentinu grape here produces a superb white.

     

    PATRIMONIO BLANC

    This is a pale yellow wine that is tinged with green, It has floral notes (may blossom and white flowers), a fresh and fruity taste and it is full-bodied and rounded, sometimes causing a light tingling of the tongue. Drink this elegant French wine at approx. 10°C (50°F).

     

    PATRIMONIO ROSE

    This French wine has a pale, clear pink colour and aromas of red fruit (cherry, redcurrant), and sometimes also of exotic fruit. Drink this fresh and fruity rose at approx. 10°C (50°F).

     

    PATRIMONIO ROUGE

    Two different types of Patrimonio red are made: a lighter one and the traditional more robust French wine. The lighter Patrimonio is generally ruby red, very fruity (blackcurrant, blackberry), velvet soft in spite of the presence of tannin, and very well balanced.

    When it is older the fruity nose develops earthly notes such as humus. Drink this French wine at approx. 16°C (60 .8°F) with red meat, game, casseroles, and hard cheeses. The more robust, traditional Patrimonio is darker in colour and has more tannin than the lighter version. When older its fruity bouquet develops into a complex nose of overripe preserved fruit, leather, and liquorice. Drink this 'strong man' of a French wine between 16- l8°C (60 .8- 64.4°F) . Both French wines are best decanted several hours before a meal.

     

    VIN DE CORSE CALVI

    Here very fruity red wines, fascinating, refined, and aromatic roses, and almost colourless, comforting, and approachable white wines are produced on very changeable soils of coarse stones, boulders, and gravel using Niellucciu, Grenache, Cinsault, Sciaccarellu, and Vermentinu grapes.

     

    Ajaccio

    This French wine area lies on rough, rocky hills. Ajaccio is proud of its permanent resident - the Sciaccarellu grape - with which the greatest French wines from this area develop a nose that evokes roasted almond and red fruit such as raspberry.

    This traditional French wine is good for laying down. The white Malvoisie (Vermentinu) is also worth laying down.

     

    Vin de Corse Sarténais

    The Sciaccarellu, Grenache and Cinsault vines cultivated on these steep hills produce a full-bodied red wine and fresh rose. These French wines are mainly consumed by the local populace and are rarely seen outside the island.

    • VIN DE CORSE FIGARI

    The most southerly wine-growing area of France, just north of the town of Bonifacio. Sturdy red, rose, and white wines are produced.

    • VIN DE CORSE PORTO VECCHIO

    An elegant, full-bodied, and rounded red wine and fresh, refined, and very aromatic rose are made in the south-east of the island using the Niellucciu and Sciaccarellu grapes, together with Grenache. A very dry white wine that is intensely fruity is made here with Vermentinu grapes.

    • VIN DE CORSE

    In Corsican terms the vineyards around Aleria and close to Bastia are immense at 1,550 hectares. This is a relatively new appellation but the early results are promising. After centuries of neglect the vineyards have been re-established in places where the Greeks and Romans made their best wines, at the foot of 1,200 metres (3 ,937 feet) high rocky walls. All the types of French wine are produced here, including Vin de Pays.

    There are both very traditional winemakers and ultra-modern co-operatives which are gaining an increasing reputation in France and abroad for their less traditional but well-made wines. Even the Vin de Pays here is of quality. The demand for this AC is increasing as is also the case for the Vins de Pays and vins de cepages. Fewer inferior French wines are now being produced on Corsica with the growers having decided to improve their image.{jcomments on}

  • The various category by French wine

    Vin de table for French wine

    Anjou Blanc French wineBasically Vins de table are fairly simple wines for daily consumption with a consistent taste that is usually achieved through blending. Some specific wines are also included in this category.

     

    Vins de Pays for French wine

    The growth in Vin de Pays wines is enormous at the present time and this is not suprising because of the great inprovements in quality of this better table wine in recent years.

    A Vin de Pays originates from a strictly defined wine-growing area, representing the soul of a specific territoir and is linked to the special characteristics of one or more varieties of grapes. Consumers find these French wines appproacheble with clear language on the label. Some Vins de Pays wines are so well made and demonstrate such love on the part of the wine maker that they outperform characterless AOC wines of anonymous wine merchants in both quality and price. Today’s wine drinkers demand quality for their money.

     

    Appellation – Vins Delimite de Qualite Superieure (VDQS)

    The quality of these French wines is certainly not lower than AOC wines. The criteria for selection are indeed often more rigid than for most AOC wines. VDQS wines are the only ones which have to be tested annually on order to retain their category. A VDQS wine is always therefore approved by a panel of experts before the predicate is awarded. For this reason you can rely totally on this category.

     

    Appellation d’Origine Controlee (AC) for French Wines

    French wine classed as AOC (usually referred to as AC) originates from a clearly defined area in which the soil, climate, variety of grapes, and various legally-defined requiments provide a guarantee that the wine originates fron a given place. This is not, however, a guarantee of quality since these French wines are not tested each year and some of them do not deserve a quality predicate. Despite this, AOC wines form the top category of French wines.

     

    Alsace Grapes

    Additional information on the label for French wine

    Here we mean additions such as ‘Premiere Cru’, or ‘Grand Cru’ for Bordeaux wines, not such meaningless phrases as ‘Vin Supérieure de la cave du patron’ or ‘Cuvée reservé du sommelier’.

    The better Bordeaux were classified in 1885 for a World Exhibition, based on quality criteria of the time. At that time ot related solely to wines of Médoc, Sauternes and on wine from Graves.

    This lattercategory received its own Cru in 1959. Other area which have a similar Premier and Grand Cru classification include St Emilion and Côtes de Procence. Since 1932 the term ‘Cru bourgeois’ has also been used in Médoc. In Burgundy terms such as ‘Premier Cru’ and ‘Grand Cru’ are part of the official name of origin.

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  • Wines from France

    The Wine from France

    Wine from FranceThe first cultivated vines were probably planted by the Greeks around Marseille, although it was the Romans who, over the course of 500 years, introduced the wine making tradition throughout the country. Experimentation with vines and wine making techniques took place hundreds of years ago, and people now generally accept which area produce the best grapes, what varieties are most suited to them, how they should be trained and so on.

    Today, France can boast more great wines than any other nation, and the grape varieties used to produce then have been exported around the globe setting the standards for others. Apart from the prestige region of Bordeaux, Burgundy, Champagne, Rhone and the Loire, there are scores of other regions where the quality of wine has improved almost beyond recognition in the past two decades, and which have not been hit by the rocketing prices which have put many top-name wines out of the reach of most consumers.